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Biological nitrogen fixation of vegetable legumes under reduced nitrogen or water supply

International Conference
Ntatsi, G., Vougeleka, V., Giannikos, G., Tsopelopoulos, K., Aliferis, K.A., Tampakaki, A., Saitanis, C.J., Savvas, D.
Proceedings of International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS). XXX International Horticultural Congress. Tropical and Subtropical Vegetable Production: Tackling Present and Future Global Biotic and Abiotic Stressors, Insgtabul, Turkey, August 12-16
Publication year: 2018

Variety of Achhenorrhyncha species in alfalfa crops

National Conference
Ambatzi AP, Tsagarakis SA, Saitanis K. and Papadoulis G.Th.
17th Panhellenic Entomological Conference. 19-22 Sep. 1917. Agricultural University of Athens. p 13
Publication year: 2017

The effect of ozone (O3) on the metabolism of bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L ., cv. Pinto)

International Conference
Vougeleka, V., Ntatsi, G., Agathokleous, E., Savvas D., Aliferis, K.A., Saitanis, C.I
28th Conference of the Hellenic Society of Fruit and Vegetable Science (EEEO), Thessaloniki, 16-20 October 2017, summaries of announcements, p. 241.
Publication year: 2017

Metabolic analysis of the effect of Ethylene diurea (EDU) and ozone on Pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants

International Conference
Savvas D., Vougeleka V., Ntatsi   G., Agathokleous E., Aliferis K., and Saitanis C.
VII South-Eastern Europe Symposium on Vegetables and Potatoes. 20-23 June 2017, Maribor, Slovenia
Publication year: 2017

Interactive effects of ozone and soil on the decomposition process in a Free Air Controlled Exposure (FACE) system.

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Ntatsi G., Kitao M., Saitanis C.J., Sarneel J., Paoletti E. and Koike T.
IUFRO 125th Anniversary Congress, 18 – 22 September 2017, Freiburg, Germany
Publication year: 2017

Hybrid larch F1 grown under O3-enriched atmosphere and treated with ethylenediurea. 

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Kitao M., Zhang C., Paoletti E., Manning W.J., Saitanis C.J., and Koike T.
The 2nd International Conference on Environmental Pollution and Health. 12-14 May 2017, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China
Publication year: 2017

Can elevated O3 affect the decomposition process in different types of soil? 

International Conference
Agathokleous E., De Marco A., Kitao M., Koike T., Manning W.J., Ntatsi G., Paoletti E., Saitanis C.J, Sicard P., Sarneel J., and Vitale M.
The 28th IUFRO conference for Specialists in Air Pollution and Climate Change Impacts on Forest Ecosystems: “Actions for Sustainable Forest Ecosystems under Air Pollution and Climate Change”, 22-26 October 2017, Tokyo 
Publication year: 2017

Application and further characterization of the snap bean S156/R123 ozone biomonitoring system in relation to ambient air temperature

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J., Burkey K.O., Ntatsi G., Vougeleka V., Mashaheet A.M., Pallides A.
Science of the Total Environment 580: 1046-1055
Publication year: 2017

Abstract

Increased mixing ratios of ground-level ozone (O3) threaten individual plants, plant communities and ecosystems. In this sense, O3 biomonitoring is of great interest. The O3-sensitive S156 and the O3-tolerant R123 genotypes of snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) have been proposed as a potential tool for active biomonitoring of ambient O3. In the present study, an O3 biomonitoring was conducted, with the S156/R123 tool, along with a monitoring of O3 and other environmental conditions in an urban area in Athens, Greece, during the growing seasons of 2012 and 2013. Plant yield was evaluated to assess the effectiveness of AOT40 in interpreting O3-induced phytotoxicity. Across the two genotypes, an approximately two times lower total number of pods – and consequently lower bulk mass of seeds – was found in 2012 than in 2013, although there was no significant difference in the final AOT40 between the two years. No significant differences were observed in the stomatal density or conductance between the two genotypes, whereas it was estimated that, in both genotypes, the abaxial leaf surface contributes 2.7 fold to O3 intake in comparison to the adaxial one. By testing the role of ambient air temperature in outdoor plant environment chambers (OPECs), it was found that increased temperature limits mature pod formation and complicates interpretation of O3 impacts in terms of S156/R123 yields ratios. This is the first study providing evidence for a hormetic response of plants to ambient air temperature. This study also points out the complexity of using yield as a measure of O3 impact across different environments with the snap bean system, whereas visible foliar injury is more consistently related to O3 effects.

Urban trees: An efficient tool for monitoring metallic elements' pollution. A case study from biomonitoring in playgrounds in Attica, Greece

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C., Lappa K., Ntatsi G., and Koike T.
IUFRO Regional Congress for Asia and Oceania 2016, Air pollution and climate change impacts on forest ecosystems. 24-27 October 2016, Beijing, People's Republic of China
Publication year: 2016

The first toxicological study with the antiozonant and research tool ethylenediurea (EDU): hints to its mode of action

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Mouzaki-Paxinou A-Ch., Saitanis C.J. , Paoletti E., Manning W.J.
Environmental Pollution 213, 996-1006
Publication year: 2016

Abstract

The antiozonant and research tool ethylene diurea (EDU) is widely studied as a phytoprotectant against the widespread pollutant ground-surface ozone. Although it has been extensively used, its potential toxicity in the absence of ozone is unknown and its mode of action is unclear. The purpose of this research was to toxicologically assess EDU and to further investigate its mode of action using Lemna minor L. as a model organism. Application of EDU concentrations greater than 593 mg L−1 (practically 600 mg L−1) resulted in adverse inhibition of colony growth. As no-observed-toxic-effects concentration (NOEL) we recommend a concentration of 296 mg L−1 (practically 300 mg L−1). A hormetic response was detected, i.e. stimulatory effects of low EDU concentrations, which may indicate overcompensation in response to disruption in homeostasis. Growth inhibition and suppressed biomass were associated with impacted chlorophyll a fluorescence (ΦPSIIqP and ETR). Furthermore, EDU increased mesophyll thickness, as indicated by frond succulence index. Applications of concentrations ≥593 mg L−1 to uncontrolled environments should be avoided due to potential toxicity to sensitive organisms and the environment.

The first study of tropospheric ozone effects on plants in Cyprus.

National Conference
Pallides A., Vougeleka V.J., Burkey K.O.,  Saitanis, C.J. Agathokleous, E., Papadimitriou, D.
8th Congress of the Hellenic Ecologcal Society - HELECOS 8th Oct. 20-23,  2016. Thessaloniki. Greece
Publication year: 2016

Saplings of a hybrid larch F1 (Larix gmelinii var. japonica × L. kaempferi) grown under elevated O3 levels and treated with Ethylene diurea: a free-air-O3-enrichment experiment in northern East Asia

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Kita K., Paoletti E., Manning W.J., Saitanis C.J. and Koike T.
In: The 29th Task Force Meeting of the UNECE ICP Vegetation for Europe Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (Dubna, February 29 – March 4, 2016): Programme and Abstracts. – Dubna: JINR, 2016. – 22 p. ISBN: 978-5-9530-0433-6
Publication year: 2016

Olive oil for dressing plant leaves so as to avoid O3 injury

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J.,Stamatelopoulos D., Mouzaki-Paxinou A-Ch.,  Paoletti E., Manning W.J.
Water Air and Soil Pollution 227, Article number: 282
Publication year: 2016

Abstract

The persistence of high ground-level ozone (O3) concentration in most regions of the northern hemisphere has severe implications to crop production, wild plant conservation, and forest sustainability. Therefore, methods for plant protection against O3 and O3 biomonitoring are of high relevance; however, there is not a method that can be applied in cultivations, which are intended for human consumption. After spraying bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Pinto) seedlings with ethylene diurea, olive oil, or myclobutanil and exposing them to O3-enriched air (90 nmol mol−1) for a week (8 h day−1), we found that commercial olive oil can be effectively used as a protectant of plants against O3. This protection is attributed to avoidance of O3 uptake into the mesophyll, via decreased stomatal conductance. Olive oil can be applied even in organic cultivations, either for biomonitoring purposes or for short-term protection of plants during O3 episodes. Further studies are needed in order to investigate potential direct reaction of O3 with olive oil. Yet, attention should be paid when myclobutanil is applied to plants which are used for O3 biomonitoring purposes due to potential confounding effects by increasing O3-caused visible injury to plant leaves.

Interactive effect of Ethylenediurea, O3 pollution and insect grazing on willow saplings cultivated in a free-air-O3 system

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Koike T., Kanie S., Paoletti E., Manning W.J. and Saitanis C.J.
IUFRO Regional Congress for Asia and Oceania 2016, Air pollution and climate change impacts on forest ecosystems. 24-27 October 2016, Beijing, People's Republic of China
Publication year: 2016

Impacts of ethylene diurea (EDU) soil drench and foliar spray in Salix sachalinensis protection against O3-induced injury

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Paoletti E.,  Saitanis C.J., Manning W.J., Sugai T., Koike T.
Science of the Total Environement 573:1053-1062
Publication year: 2016

Abstract

It is widely accepted that elevated levels of surface ozone (O3) negatively affect plants. Ethylenediurea (EDU) is a synthetic substance which effectively protects plants against O3-caused phytotoxicity. Among other questions, the one still open is: which EDU application method is more appropriate for treating fast-growing tree species. The main aims of this study were: (i) to test if chronic exposure of Salix sachalinensis plants to 200–400 mg EDU L− 1, the usually applied range for protection against O3 phytotoxicity, is beneficial to plants; (ii) to evaluate the effects of chronic exposure to elevated O3 on S. sachalinensis; (iii) to assess the efficacy of two methods (i.e. soil drench and foliar spray) of EDU application to plants; (iv) to investigate the appropriate concentration of EDU to protect against elevated O3-induced damage in S. sachalinensis; and (v) to compare the two methods of EDU application in terms of effectiveness and EDU consumption. Current-year cuttings grown  in infertile soil free from organic matter were exposed either to low ambient O3 (AOZ, 10-h ≈ 28.3 nmol mol− 1) or to elevated O3 (EOZ, 10-h ≈ 65.8 nmol mol− 1) levels during daylight hours. Over the growing season, plants were treated every nine days with 200 mL soil drench of 0, 200 or 400 mg EDU L− 1 or with foliar spray of 0, 200 or 400 mg EDU L− 1 (in two separate experiments). We found that EDU per se had no effects on plants exposed to AOZ. EOZ practically significantly injured S. sachalinensis plants, and the impact was indifferent between the experiments. EDU did not protect plants against EOZ impact when applied as soil drench but it did protect them when applied as 200–400 mg L− 1 foliar spray. We conclude that EDU may be more effective against O3 phytotoxicity to fast-growing species when applied as a spray than when applied as a drench.

Keymessage: Soil-drenched EDU was ineffective in protecting willow plants against O3-induced injury, whereas foliar-sprayed EDU was effective even at the concentration of 200 mg L− 1.