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Hormesis shifts the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL)

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J. and Markouizou A.
Dose-Response, January-March 2021:1-3
Publication year: 2021

Data from recent dose-response toxicological studies suggest that the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) may depend upon whether hormesis is present. A further examination of these data supports this hypothesis by showing that the NOAEL was greater for living units (organisms or cells) showing hormesis than for living units showing no hormesis. For example, some cancer tissue cells may exhibit hormetic responses to an anticancer drug while some other cancer tissue cells may not. These findings suggest that living units showing hormesis may also be less susceptible than living units not showing hormesis. However, these findings are preliminary and cannot be generalized or assumed to be a norm yet. New studies are needed to evaluate how NOAEL shifts depending on the occurrence of hormesis.

Exogenous application of melatonin to plants, algae, and harvested products to sustain agricultural productivity and enhance nutritional and nutraceutical value: A meta-analysis

Journal Paper
Agathokleous, E., Zhou, B., Xu, J., Ioannou, A., Feng, Z., Saitanis, C.J., Frei, M., Calabrese, E.J., and Fotopoulos, V.
Environmental Research. Vol. 200, Sep. 2021, 111746
Publication year: 2021

Abstract

Melatonin is produced by plants, algae, and animals. Worldwide studies show diverse positive effects of exogenous melatonin on plants, edible plant products, and algae, but the potential of melatonin to enhance food and feed systems through these positive effects remains largely unexplored. Through a meta-analysis of about 25,000 observations, we show for the first time that exogenous application of melatonin significantly increases crop productivity and yields, and enhances the nutritional and nutraceutical value of edible plant products and algae by regulating diverse biological functions. We demonstrate that melatonin can improve plants, edible plant products, and algae under various current climate change scenarios, environmental pollution factors, and other stresses by about 7% to nearly 30%, on average, depending on the stressor. We also analyze various technical/methodological factors influencing the desired outcomes and identify conditions that offer optimal enhancement. We show that the positive effect of melatonin on plants and edible plant products varies among species, genera, and families, and strongly depends on the concentration of melatonin and treatment duration. The effect of melatonin is slightly lower on the monocot clade Commelinids than on the eudicot clades Asterids and Rosids. We also show that its stimulatory effect on plants depends on cultivation system, with a larger effect obtained in hydroponic systems. However, it does not depend on application stage (seed or vegetative), application route (foliage, roots, or seed), and whether the cultivation system is ex vivo or in vivo. This is the first meta-analysis examining the effects of melatonin on plants, edible plant products, and algae, and offers a scientific and technical roadmap facilitating sustainable food and feed production through the application of exogenous melatonin.

Το φαινόμενο της όρμησης στην τοξικολογία (Hormesis phenomenon in Toxicology)

Book Chapter
Αγαθοκλέους Ε., Μαρκουίζου Α., Σαϊτάνης Κ.Ι. (Agathokleous E., Markouizou A., Saitanis C.J.)
Κεφάλαιο 6. Στο: Τσατσάκης Α. Τοξικολογία στο σύγχρονο κόσμο. Ιατρικές Εκδόσεις Νέον. (Chapter 6. In: Tsatsakis A. Toxicology in the modern world. Publisher: Medical Editions Neon ISBN: 978-618-84478-0-6
Publication year: 2020

Plant susceptibility to ozone: A Tower of Babel? 

Journal Paper
Agathokleous, E. and Saitanis, C.J., 
Science of the Total Environment,Volume 703, 134962
Publication year: 2020

Abstract

In a world with climate change and environmental pollution, modern Biology is concerned with organismic susceptibility. At the same time, policy and decision makers seek information about organismic susceptibility. Therefore, information about organismic susceptibility may have far-reaching implications to the entire biosphere that can extend to several forthcoming generations. Here, we review a sample of approximately 200 published peer-reviewed articles dealing with plant response to ground-level ozone to understand how the information about susceptibility is communicated. A fuzzy and often incorrect terminology was used to describe the responsiveness of plants to ozone. Susceptibility was classified too arbitrarily and this was reflected to the approximately 50 descriptive words that were used to characterize susceptibility. The classification of susceptibility was commonly based on calculated probability (p) value. This practice is inappropriate as p values do not provide any basis for effect or susceptibility magnitude. To bridge the gap between science and policy decision making, classification of susceptibility should be done using alternative approaches, such as effect size estimates in conjunction with multivariate ordination statistics.

Ozone Effects on Vegetation: A Walk from Cells to Ecosystems

Book Chapter
Burkey K.O., Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J., Mashaheet A. M. , Koike T. and Hung Y.-T.
Chapter 10. Ozone Effects on Vegetation: A Walk from Cells to Ecosystems. In: Hung, Y.T., Wang, L.K., and N. Shammas eds. Handbook of Environment and Waste Management, Volume 3: Acid Rain and Greenhouse Gas Pollution Control, pp. 357-396 (ISBN-10: 9811207127). World Scientific Publishing Co. Inc, Singapore, 14 August 2020. DOI: 10.1142/9789811207136_0010
Publication year: 2020

Ozone biomonitoring: A versatile tool for science, education and regulation

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J., Feng Z., De Marco A., Araminiene V., Domingos M., Sicard P., Paoletti E.
Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health, 18:7-13
Publication year: 2020

Abstract

Ground-level ozone (O3) pollution can adversely affect human health and vegetation, thus being an important environmental issue nowadays. Ozone biological monitoring (biomonitoring) is a method of O3 monitoring by observing quantitative changes in living organisms physically present in a specific environment. Here, we provide a concise view of the field of O3 biomonitoring, along with recent advances that are expected to advance this field in the future. We also recommend that O3 biomonitoring is included in citizen science initiatives as well as in worldwide curricula of educational institutions. Policy-makers and general public may not understand biomonitoring data; hence, a major challenge is how to communicate the information to the audience in a way that permits the best comprehension.

Ozone affects plant, insect and soil microbial communities and threatens terrestrial ecosystems and biodiversity

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Feng Z., Oksanen E., Sicard P., Qi Wang, Saitanis C.J.,  Araminiene V., Blande J.D., Hayes F., Calatayud V., Domingos M., Veresoglou S., Peñuelas J., Wardle D.A., De Marco A., Li Z., Harmens H., Yuan X., Vitale M., Kreft H., Sala O.E., Paoletti E
Science Advances, Vol. 6, no. 33, eabc1176 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abc1176
Publication year: 2020

Abstract

Elevated ground-level ozone (O3) pollution can adversely affect plants and inhibit plant growth and productivity, threatening food security and ecological health. It is therefore essential to develop measures to protect plants against O3-induced adverse effects. Here we summarize the current status of phytoprotection against O3-induced adverse effects and consider recent scientific and engineering advances, to provide a novel perspective for maximizing plant health while reducing environmental/ecological risks in an O3-polluted world. We suggest that nanoscience and nanotechnology can provide a new dimension in the protection of plants against O3-induced adverse effects, and recommend that new studies are based upon a green chemistry perspective.

Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations induce adverse effects in plants. We reviewed how ozone affects (i) the composition and diversity of plant communities by affecting key physiological traits; (ii) foliar chemistry and the emission of volatiles, thereby affecting plant-plant competition, plant-insect interactions, and the composition of insect communities; and (iii) plant-soil-microbe interactions and the composition of soil communities by disrupting plant litterfall and altering root exudation, soil enzymatic activities, decomposition, and nutrient cycling. The community composition of soil microbes is consequently changed, and alpha diversity is often reduced. The effects depend on the environment and vary across space and time. We suggest that Atlantic islands in the Northern Hemisphere, the Mediterranean Basin, equatorial Africa, Ethiopia, the Indian coastline, the Himalayan region, southern Asia, and Japan have high endemic richness at high ozone risk by 2100.

On the atmospheric ozone monitoring methodologies

Journal Paper
Saitanis J.C., Sicard P., De Marco A., Feng Z., Paoletti E., Agathokleous E.
Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health, Volume 18, Pages 40-46
Publication year: 2020

Abstract

Elevated ground-level ozone (O3) pollution can adversely affect plants and inhibit plant growth and productivity, threatening food security and ecological health. It is therefore essential to develop measures to protect plants against O3-induced adverse effects. Here we summarize the current status of phytoprotection against O3-induced adverse effects and consider recent scientific and engineering advances, to provide a novel perspective for maximizing plant health while reducing environmental/ecological risks in an O3-polluted world. We suggest that nanoscience and nanotechnology can provide a new dimension in the protection of plants against O3-induced adverse effects, and recommend that new studies are based upon a green chemistry perspective.

Ozone (O3) is a natural component of the atmosphere. It occurs in the stratosphere, where it protects biota against ultraviolet radiation, but also in the lower troposphere, where it can directly harm biota. Because of its (i) high toxicological potential for biota, (ii) high reactivity and molecular instability, and (iii) difficult differentiation from other reactive oxygen species, O3 challenges scientists in a continuing effort to develop methods for its monitoring. We present here the operation principles of the most used techniques, along with some new technological developments for atmospheric O3 monitoring, with emphasis upon near surface. Huge amounts of scientific data have been produced thanks to progresses in O3 monitoring technologies. However, it remains a challenge to further develop reliable methods with rapid response and high sensitivity to ambient O3, which will also be free from the disadvantages of the current technologies.

Ground-Level Ozone Profile and the Role of Plants as Sources and Sinks

Book Chapter
Saitanis, C.J., Agathokleous, E., Burkey, K., and Hung, Y.T.
Chapter 8. In: Hung, Y.T., Wang, L.K., and N. Shammas eds. Handbook of Environment and Waste Management, Volume 3: Acid Rain and Greenhouse Gas Pollution Control, pp. 281-324. (ISBN-10: 9811207127). World Scientific Publishing Co. Inc, Singapore, 14 August 2020. DOI: 10.1142/9789811207136_0008
Publication year: 2020

Exogenous application of chemicals for protecting plants against ambient ozone pollution: What should come next?

Journal Paper
Saitanis J.C. and Agathokleous E.
Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health, 19: 100215
Publication year: 2020

Abstract

Elevated ground-level ozone (O3) pollution can adversely affect plants and inhibit plant growth and productivity, threatening food security and ecological health. It is therefore essential to develop measures to protect plants against O3-induced adverse effects. Here we summarize the current status of phytoprotection against O3-induced adverse effects and consider recent scientific and engineering advances, to provide a novel perspective for maximizing plant health while reducing environmental/ecological risks in an O3-polluted world. We suggest that nanoscience and nanotechnology can provide a new dimension in the protection of plants against O3-induced adverse effects, and recommend that new studies are based upon a green chemistry perspective.

Differential Ozone Responses Identified Among Key Rust Susceptible Wheat Genotypes

Journal Paper
Mashaheet A.M., Burkey K.O., Saitanis C.J., Abdelrhim A.S., Ullah R., Marshall D.S.
Agronomy 2020, 10, 1853.
Publication year: 2020

Abstract

Increasing ambient ozone (O3) concentrations and resurgent rust diseases are two concomitant limiting factors to wheat production worldwide. Breeding resilient wheat cultivars bearing rust resistance and O3 tolerance while maintaining high yield is critical for global food security. This study aims at identifying ozone tolerance among key rust-susceptible wheat genotypes [Rust near-universal susceptible genotypes (RnUS)], as a first step towards achieving this goal. Tested RnUS included seven bread wheat genotypes (Chinese Spring, Line E, Little Club, LMPG 6, McNair 701, Morocco and Thatcher), and one durum wheat line (Rusty). Plants were treated with five O3 concentrations (CF, 50, 70, 90, and 110 ppb), in two O3 exposure systems [continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and outdoor-plant environment chambers (OPEC)], at 21–23 Zadoks decimal growth stage. Visible injury and biomass accumulation rate were used to assess O3 responses. Visible injury data showed consistent order of genotype sensitivity (Thatcher, LMPG 6 > McNair 701, Rusty > Line E, Morocco, Little Club > Chinese Spring). Additionally, leaves at different orders showed differential O3 responses. Biomass accumulation under O3 stress showed similar results for the bread wheat genotypes. However, the durum wheat line “Rusty” had the most O3-sensitive biomass production, providing a contrasting O3 response to the tolerance reported in durum wheat. Chinese Spring was the most tolerant genotype based on both parameters and could be used as a source for O3 tolerance, while sensitive genotypes could be used as sensitive parents in mapping O3 tolerance in bread wheat. The suitability of visible symptoms and biomass responses in high-throughput screening of wheat for O3 tolerance was discussed. The results presented in this research could assist in developing future approaches to accelerate breeding wheat for O3 tolerance using existing breeding materials.

Ambient Ozone Alternative Monitoring And Biomonitoring With Higher Plants

Book Chapter
Saitanis C.J., Burkey K.O., Agathokleous E., and Hung Y.-T.
Chapter 9. In: Hung, Y.T., Wang, L.K., and N. Shammas eds. Handbook of Environment and Waste Management, Volume 3: Acid Rain and Greenhouse Gas Pollution Control, pp. 325-356 (ISBN-10: 9811207127). World Scientific Publishing Co. Inc, Singapore, 14 August 2020. DOI: 10.1142/9789811207136_0009
Publication year: 2020

Study of the effect of different rootstocks on the growth and production of beans grown under increased salinity conditions

National Conference
Vougelekas V., Datsi G., Mylonas F., TabakakiA., Saitanis K.I., Savvas D.
Scientific Conference of EEEO. Research Applications and Leading Technologies in Plant Production. Patras 15-18 Oct. 2019. Book of Abstracts, p. 211
Publication year: 2019

Stress response and population dynamics: Is Allee effect hormesis?

Journal Paper
Saitanis C.J., and Agathokleous E.
Science of the Total Environment, 682, pp. 623-628
Publication year: 2019

Abstract

Hormesis is a fundamental notion in ecotoxicology while competition between organisms is an essential notion in population ecology and species adaptation and evolution. Both sub-disciplines of ecology deal with the response of organisms to abiotic and biotic stresses. In ecotoxicology, the Linear-non-Threshold (LNT), Threshold and Hormetic models are used to describe the dominant responses of a plethora of endpoints to abiotic stress. In population ecology, the logistic, theta-logistic and the Allee effect models are used to describe the growth of populations under different responses to (biotic) stress induced by population density. The per capita rate of population increase (r) measures species fitness. When it is used as endpoint, the responses to population density seem to perfectly correspond to LNT, Threshold and Hormetic responses to abiotic stress, respectively. Our analysis suggests the Allee effect is a hormetic-like response of r to population density, an ultimate biotic stress. This biphasic dose-response model appears across different systems and situations (from molecules to tumor growth to population dynamics), is highly supported by ecological and evolutionary theory, and has important implications in most sub-disciplines of biology as well as in environmental and earth sciences. Joined multi-disciplinary efforts would facilitate the development and application of advanced research approaches for better understanding potential planetary-scale implications.

Predicting the effect of ozone on vegetation via the linear non-threshold (LNT), threshold and hormetic dose-response models

Journal Paper
Agathokleous, E., Belz, R.G., Calatayud, V., De Marco, A., Hoshika, Y., Kitao, M., Saitanis, C.J., Sicard, P., Paoletti, E., Calabrese, E.J.
Science of the Total Environment 649: 61-74.
Publication year: 2019

Abstract

The nature of the dose-response relationship in the low dose zone and how this concept may be used by regulatory agencies for science-based policy guidance and risk assessment practices are addressed here by using the effects of surface ozone (O3) on plants as a key example for dynamic ecosystems sustainability. This paper evaluates the current use of the linear non-threshold (LNT) dose-response model for O3. The LNT model has been typically applied in limited field studies which measured damage from high exposures, and used to estimate responses to lower concentrations. This risk assessment strategy ignores the possibility of biological acclimation to low doses of stressor agents. The upregulation of adaptive responses by low O3 concentrations typically yields pleiotropic responses, with some induced endpoints displaying hormetic-like biphasic dose-response relationships. Such observations recognize the need for risk assessment flexibility depending upon the endpoints measured, background responses, as well as possible dose-time compensatory responses. Regulatory modeling strategies would be significantly improved by the adoption of the hormetic dose response as a formal/routine risk assessment option based on its substantial support within the literature, capacity to describe the entire dose-response continuum, documented explanatory dose-dependent mechanisms, and flexibility to default to a threshold feature when background responses preclude application of biphasic dose responses.

Effects of ozone and ammonium sulfate on cauliflower: emphasis on the interaction between plants and insect herbivores

Journal Paper
Agathokleous, E., WaiLi,  Y., Ntatsi, G., Konno, K., Saitanis, C.J., Kitao, M., and Koike, T.
 Science of the Total Environment 659: 995-1007
Publication year: 2019

Abstract

Ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2SO4] deposition and elevated ozone (O3) concentrations may negatively affect plants and trophic interactions. This study aimed to evaluate for the first time the interactive effects of high (NH4)2SO4 load and elevated O3 levels on cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) under field conditions. Cauliflower seedlings were treated with 0 (AS0) or 50 (AS50) kg ha−1 (NH4)2SO4 and exposed to ambient (AOZ, ≈20 ppb) or elevated (EOZ, ≈55 ppb) O3 for about one month, in a Free Air O3 Concentration Enrichment (FACE) system. The oligophagous diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella Linnaeus, 1758) showed a clear preference towards the seedlings treated with AS50, which intensively grazed. Plant-herbivore interactions were driven by (NH4)2SO4 availability, rather than O3, via increased nitrogen content in the leaves. Further laboratory bioassays were followed to confirm the validity of these observations using polyphagous Eri silkmoth larvae (Samia ricini) as a biological model in a standardized experimental setup. Choice assays, where larvae could select leaves among leaf samples from the different experimental conditions, and no-choice assays, where larvae could graze leaves from just one experimental condition, were conducted. In the choice assay, the larvae preferred AS50-treated leaves, in agreement with the field observations with diamondback moth. In the no-choice assay, larval body mass growth was inhibited when fed with leaves treated with EOZ and/or AS50. Larvae fed with AS50-treated leaves displayed increased mortality. These observations coincide with higher NO3 and Zn content in AS50-treated leaves. This study shows that plant-herbivore interactions can be driven by (NH4)2SO4 availability, independently of O3, and suggests that high N deposition may have severe health implications in animals consuming such plant tissues.

Key message: Plant-herbivore interactions are driven by high (NH4)2SO4 availability, independently of O3.

Effect of grafting on growth, production and biological nitrogen binding of Greek bean varieties

National Conference
Vougeleka V., Datsi G., Panagiotakis I., TabakakiA., Saitanis K.I., Savvas D.
Scientific Conference of EEEO. Research Applications and Leading Technologies in Plant Production. Patras 15-18 Oct. 2019. Book of Abstracts, p. 103
Publication year: 2019

Commentary: EPA’s proposed expansion of dose-response analysis is a positive step towards improving its ecological risk assessment

Journal Paper
Agathokleous, E., Anav, A., Araminiene, V., De Marco, A., Domingos, M., Kitao, M., Koike, T., Manning, W.J., Paoletti, E., Saitanis, C.J., Sicard, P., Vitale, M., Wang, W., and Calabrese, E.J.
Environmental Pollution 246: 566-570
Publication year: 2019

Abstract

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has recently proposed changes to strengthen the transparency of its pivotal regulatory science policy and procedures. In this context, the US EPA aims to enhance the transparency of dose-response data and models, proposing to consider for the first time non-linear biphasic dose-response models. While the proposed changes have the potential to lead to markedly improved ecological risk assessment compared to past and current approaches, we believe there remain open issues for improving the quality of ecological risk assessment, such as the consideration of adaptive, dynamic and interactive effects. Improved risk assessment including adaptive and dynamic non-linear models (beyond classic threshold models) can enhance the quality of regulatory decisions and the protection of ecological health. We suggest that other countries consider adopting a similar scientific-regulatory posture with respect to dose-response modeling via the inclusion of non-linear biphasic models, that incorporate the dynamic potential of biological systems to adapt (i.e., enhancing positive biological endpoints) or maladapt to low levels of stressor agents.

A quantitative assessment of hormetic responses of plants to ozone

Journal Paper
Agathokleous, E., Araminiene, V., Belz, R.G., Calatayud, V., De Marco, A., Domingos, M., Feng, Z., Hoshika, Y., Kitao, M., Koike, T., Paoletti, E., Saitanis, C.J., Sicard, P., Calabrese, E.J.
Environmental Research, 176, art. no. 108527.
Publication year: 2019

Abstract

Evaluations of ozone effects on vegetation across the globe over the last seven decades have mostly incorporated exposure levels that were multi-fold the preindustrial concentrations. As such, global risk assessments and derivation of critical levels for protecting plants and food supplies were based on extrapolation from high to low exposure levels. These were developed in an era when it was thought that stress biology is framed around a linear dose-response. However, it has recently emerged that stress biology commonly displays non-linear, hormetic processes. The current biological understanding highlights that the strategy of extrapolating from high to low exposure levels may lead to biased estimates. Here, we analyzed a diverse sample of published empirical data of approximately 500 stimulatory, hormetic-like dose-responses induced by ozone in plants. The median value of the maximum stimulatory responses induced by elevated ozone was 124%, and commonly <150%, of the background response (control), independently of species and response variable. The maximum stimulatory response to ozone was similar among types of response variables and major plant species. It was also similar among clades, between herbaceous and woody plants, between deciduous and evergreen trees, and between annual and perennial herbaceous plants. There were modest differences in the stimulatory response between genera and between families which may reflect different experimental designs and conditions among studies. The responses varied significantly upon type of exposure system, with open-top chambers (OTCs) underestimating the maximum stimulatory response compared to free-air ozone-concentration enrichment (FACE) systems. These findings suggest that plants show a generalized hormetic stimulation by ozone which is constrained within certain limits of biological plasticity, being highly generalizable, evolutionarily based, and maintained over ecological scales. They further highlight that non-linear responses should be taken into account when assessing the ozone effects on plants.

Preconditioning in biology and medicine – Mechanisms and translational research

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Belz R.G., Calatayud V., De Marco A., Hoshika Y., Kitao M., Saitanis C.J., Sicard P., Paoletti E., and Calabrese E.J.
International Conference of the Dose-Response Society, 17-18 April 2018, Amherst, MA, USA.
Publication year: 2018

Penconazole: A potential ozone protectant of plants? A Metabolomics’ approach.

International Conference
Vougeleka V., Ntatsi G., Aliferis K.A., Saitanis C.J., Kalampokis J.F., Agathokleous E., and Savvas D.
International Conference on Ozone and Plant Ecosystems, 21-25 May 2018, Florence. Italy.
Publication year: 2018

Parasitoids and predators of Physokermes hellenicus (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha: Coccidae) in Greece

Journal Paper
Papanastasiou, I.,  Kavallieratos, N.G., Saitanis, C.J.,  Chatzaki, M.d,  Papadoulis, G.,  Emmanouel, N.G. 
Journal of Economic Entomology. 111(3), pp. 1121-1130
Publication year: 2018

Abstract

The genus Physokermes Targioni Tozzetti includes species that are distributed in the Holarctic region and feed on conifers. The recently described scale Physokermes hellenicus (Kozár and Gounari) (Hemiptera: Coccidae) is an endemic species of Greece whose host plants are fir trees of the genus Abies (Pinales: Pinaceae). It is considered as beneficial scale insect species since its honeydew secretions are exploited by honeybees leading to the production of a special honey with important physicochemical characteristics. Since there are no previous data on the natural enemies of P. hellenicus, an investigation was carried out during 2013 in forested areas of eight mountains in south and central Greece aiming to correlate the presence of P. hellenicus with certain parasitoids and predators. Seven species of Encyrtidae, Eulophidae, Pteromalidae, and Eurytomidae (Hymenoptera); five species of Anthribidae and Coccinellidae (Coleoptera); and four species of Dictinidae, Linyphiidae, and Theridiidae (Araneae) were identified. Twelve of them were identified at the species level while four at the genus level. Among them Microterys lunatus (Dalman) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), Pseudorhopus testaceus (Ratzeburg) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), and Anthribus fasciatus Forster (Coleoptera: Anthribidae) were the most abundant natural enemies of P. hellenicus adult female while Metaphycus unicolor Hoffer (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) and Trichomasthus sp. (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) were found to parasitize P. hellenicus male nymph. Cinetata gradata (Simon) (Araneae: Linyphiidae) is reported for first time in the Greek arachnofauna. Our results suggest that the abundance of the fir scale P. hellenicus could be affected by a complex of parasitoid and predator species of different taxa. Future long-term research on these species in relation with abiotic factors would help to understand possible fluctuation of the scale’s population.

Metabolic analysis of the effect of ethylenediurea (EDU) on Pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants

National Conference
Vougeleka J.V., Ntatsi G., Agathokleous E., Savvas D., Aliferis K.A. and Saitanis, C.J.
19th Panhellenic Phytopathological Conference. Heraklion, Crete, Greece, 30 October - 1 November 2018
Publication year: 2018

How does elevated ozone affect the decomposition process in deciduous tree communities?

International Conference
Agathokleous E., De Marco A., Kato T., Kitao M., Koike T., Manning W.J., Ntatsi G., Paoletti, E., Saitanis C.J., Sarneel J., Sicard P., and Vitale M.
International Symposium on Forests and Health and Forum for Under-Forestry Economic Industry, 2-5 August 2018, Harbin, P.R. China. Extended Abstracts p.57
Publication year: 2018

Hormesis for predicting the effect of ozone on vegetation

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Belz R.G., Calatayud V., De Marco A., Hoshika Y., Kitao M., Saitanis C.J., Sicard P., Paoletti E., and Calabrese E.J.
Preconference workshop “Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in a Changing Climate”, “Climate Change in the Mediterranean and the Middle East: Challenges and Solutions”, 16-17 May 2018, Nicosia, Cyprus.
Publication year: 2018

High doses of ethylenediurea (EDU) as soil drenches did not increase leaf N content or cause phytotoxicity in willow grown in fertile soil

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Paoletti E., Manning W.J., Kitao M., Saitanis C.J., Koike T.
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 147: 574-584
Publication year: 2018

Abstract

Ground-level ozone (O3) levels are nowadays elevated in wide regions of the Earth, causing significant effects on plants that finally lead to suppressed productivity and yield losses. Ethylenediurea (EDU) is a chemical compound which is widely used in research projects as phytoprotectant against O3 injury. The EDU mode of action remains still unclear, while there are indications that EDU may contribute to plants with nitrogen (N) when the soil is poor in N and the plants have relatively small leaf area. To reveal whether the N content of EDU acts as a fertilizer to plants when the soil is not poor in N and the plants have relatively large total plant leaf area, willow plants (Salix sachalinensis Fr. Schm) were exposed to low ambient O3 levels and treated ten times (9-day interval) with 200 mL soil drench containing 0, 800 or 1600 mg EDU L−1. Fertilizer was added to a nutrient-poor soil, and the plants had an average plant leaf area of 9.1 m2 at the beginning of EDU treatments. Indications for EDU-induced hormesis in maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) and ratio of intercellular to ambient CO2 concentration (Ci:Ca) were observed at the end of the experiment. No other EDU-induced effects on leaf greenness and N content, maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), gas exchange, growth and matter production suggest that EDU did not act as N fertilizer and did not cause toxicity under these experimental conditions.

Elevated O3 affects the decomposition process in different types of soil

International Conference
Agathokleous E., De Marco A., Kitao M., Koike T., Manning, W.J., Ntatsi G., Paoletti E., Saitanis C.J., Sarneel J., Sicard P., and Vitale M.
International Conference on Ozone and Plant Ecosystems, 21-25 May 2018, Florence. Italy.
Publication year: 2018

Effects of ozone (O3) and ethylenediurea (EDU) on the ecological stoichiometry of a willow grown in a free-air exposure system.

Journal Paper
Agathokleous, E., Kitao, M., Qingnan, C., Saitanis, C.J., Paoletti, E., Manning, W.J., Watanabe, T., Koike, T.
Environmental Pollution 238C: 663-676.
Publication year: 2018

Abstract

Ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations have been elevating in the last century. While there has been a notable progress in understanding O3 effects on vegetation, O3 effects on ecological stoichiometry remain unclear, especially early in the oxidative stress. Ethyelenediurea (EDU) is a chemical compound widely applied in research projects as protectant of plants against O3 injury, however its mode of action remains unclear. To investigate O3 and EDU effects early in the stress, we sprayed willow (Salix sachalinensis) plants with 0, 200 or 400 mg EDU L−1, and exposed them to either low ambient O3 (AOZ) or elevated O3 (EOZ) levels during the daytime, for about one month, in a free air O3 controlled exposure (FACE); EDU treatment was repeated every nine days. We collected samples for analyses from basal, top, and shed leaves, before leaves develop visible O3 symptoms. We found that O3 altered the ecological stoichiometry, including impacts in nutrient resorption efficiency, early in the stress. The relation between P content and Fe content seemed to have a critical role in maintaining homeostasis in an effort to prevent O3-induced damage. Photosynthetic pigments and P content appeared to play an important role in EDU mode of action. This study provides novel insights on the stress biology which are of ecological and toxicological importance.

Effect of ozone and/or EDU on Pinto bean plants’ metabolism

International Conference
Vougeleka V., Ntatsi G., Saitanis C.J., Aliferis K.A., Kalampokis J.F., Agathokleous E. and Savvas D.
International Conference on Ozone and Plant Ecosystems, 21-25 May 2018, Florence. Italy.
Publication year: 2018

Comparing the inoculation success of two bacteria strains, under different N supply levels, in the Greek bean landrace Zargana Chryssoupolis

International Conference
Vougeleka, V., Ntatsi, G., Saitanis, C., Tampakaki, A., Savvas, D.
TRUE Legume Innovation and Networking (LIN) - Workshop of the Mediterranean Region, Athens, Apr., 20, 2018, Book of Abstracts, page. 20
Publication year: 2018

Biological nitrogen fixation of vegetable legumes under reduced nitrogen or water supply

International Conference
Ntatsi, G., Vougeleka, V., Giannikos, G., Tsopelopoulos, K., Aliferis, K.A., Tampakaki, A., Saitanis, C.J., Savvas, D.
Proceedings of International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS). XXX International Horticultural Congress. Tropical and Subtropical Vegetable Production: Tackling Present and Future Global Biotic and Abiotic Stressors, Insgtabul, Turkey, August 12-16
Publication year: 2018

Variety of Achhenorrhyncha species in alfalfa crops

National Conference
Ambatzi AP, Tsagarakis SA, Saitanis K. and Papadoulis G.Th.
17th Panhellenic Entomological Conference. 19-22 Sep. 1917. Agricultural University of Athens. p 13
Publication year: 2017

The effect of ozone (O3) on the metabolism of bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L ., cv. Pinto)

International Conference
Vougeleka, V., Ntatsi, G., Agathokleous, E., Savvas D., Aliferis, K.A., Saitanis, C.I
28th Conference of the Hellenic Society of Fruit and Vegetable Science (EEEO), Thessaloniki, 16-20 October 2017, summaries of announcements, p. 241.
Publication year: 2017

Metabolic analysis of the effect of Ethylene diurea (EDU) and ozone on Pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants

International Conference
Savvas D., Vougeleka V., Ntatsi   G., Agathokleous E., Aliferis K., and Saitanis C.
VII South-Eastern Europe Symposium on Vegetables and Potatoes. 20-23 June 2017, Maribor, Slovenia
Publication year: 2017

Interactive effects of ozone and soil on the decomposition process in a Free Air Controlled Exposure (FACE) system.

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Ntatsi G., Kitao M., Saitanis C.J., Sarneel J., Paoletti E. and Koike T.
IUFRO 125th Anniversary Congress, 18 – 22 September 2017, Freiburg, Germany
Publication year: 2017

Hybrid larch F1 grown under O3-enriched atmosphere and treated with ethylenediurea. 

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Kitao M., Zhang C., Paoletti E., Manning W.J., Saitanis C.J., and Koike T.
The 2nd International Conference on Environmental Pollution and Health. 12-14 May 2017, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China
Publication year: 2017

Can elevated O3 affect the decomposition process in different types of soil? 

International Conference
Agathokleous E., De Marco A., Kitao M., Koike T., Manning W.J., Ntatsi G., Paoletti E., Saitanis C.J, Sicard P., Sarneel J., and Vitale M.
The 28th IUFRO conference for Specialists in Air Pollution and Climate Change Impacts on Forest Ecosystems: “Actions for Sustainable Forest Ecosystems under Air Pollution and Climate Change”, 22-26 October 2017, Tokyo 
Publication year: 2017

Application and further characterization of the snap bean S156/R123 ozone biomonitoring system in relation to ambient air temperature

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J., Burkey K.O., Ntatsi G., Vougeleka V., Mashaheet A.M., Pallides A.
Science of the Total Environment 580: 1046-1055
Publication year: 2017

Abstract

Increased mixing ratios of ground-level ozone (O3) threaten individual plants, plant communities and ecosystems. In this sense, O3 biomonitoring is of great interest. The O3-sensitive S156 and the O3-tolerant R123 genotypes of snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) have been proposed as a potential tool for active biomonitoring of ambient O3. In the present study, an O3 biomonitoring was conducted, with the S156/R123 tool, along with a monitoring of O3 and other environmental conditions in an urban area in Athens, Greece, during the growing seasons of 2012 and 2013. Plant yield was evaluated to assess the effectiveness of AOT40 in interpreting O3-induced phytotoxicity. Across the two genotypes, an approximately two times lower total number of pods – and consequently lower bulk mass of seeds – was found in 2012 than in 2013, although there was no significant difference in the final AOT40 between the two years. No significant differences were observed in the stomatal density or conductance between the two genotypes, whereas it was estimated that, in both genotypes, the abaxial leaf surface contributes 2.7 fold to O3 intake in comparison to the adaxial one. By testing the role of ambient air temperature in outdoor plant environment chambers (OPECs), it was found that increased temperature limits mature pod formation and complicates interpretation of O3 impacts in terms of S156/R123 yields ratios. This is the first study providing evidence for a hormetic response of plants to ambient air temperature. This study also points out the complexity of using yield as a measure of O3 impact across different environments with the snap bean system, whereas visible foliar injury is more consistently related to O3 effects.

Urban trees: An efficient tool for monitoring metallic elements' pollution. A case study from biomonitoring in playgrounds in Attica, Greece

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C., Lappa K., Ntatsi G., and Koike T.
IUFRO Regional Congress for Asia and Oceania 2016, Air pollution and climate change impacts on forest ecosystems. 24-27 October 2016, Beijing, People's Republic of China
Publication year: 2016

The first toxicological study with the antiozonant and research tool ethylenediurea (EDU): hints to its mode of action

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Mouzaki-Paxinou A-Ch., Saitanis C.J. , Paoletti E., Manning W.J.
Environmental Pollution 213, 996-1006
Publication year: 2016

Abstract

The antiozonant and research tool ethylene diurea (EDU) is widely studied as a phytoprotectant against the widespread pollutant ground-surface ozone. Although it has been extensively used, its potential toxicity in the absence of ozone is unknown and its mode of action is unclear. The purpose of this research was to toxicologically assess EDU and to further investigate its mode of action using Lemna minor L. as a model organism. Application of EDU concentrations greater than 593 mg L−1 (practically 600 mg L−1) resulted in adverse inhibition of colony growth. As no-observed-toxic-effects concentration (NOEL) we recommend a concentration of 296 mg L−1 (practically 300 mg L−1). A hormetic response was detected, i.e. stimulatory effects of low EDU concentrations, which may indicate overcompensation in response to disruption in homeostasis. Growth inhibition and suppressed biomass were associated with impacted chlorophyll a fluorescence (ΦPSIIqP and ETR). Furthermore, EDU increased mesophyll thickness, as indicated by frond succulence index. Applications of concentrations ≥593 mg L−1 to uncontrolled environments should be avoided due to potential toxicity to sensitive organisms and the environment.

The first study of tropospheric ozone effects on plants in Cyprus.

National Conference
Pallides A., Vougeleka V.J., Burkey K.O.,  Saitanis, C.J. Agathokleous, E., Papadimitriou, D.
8th Congress of the Hellenic Ecologcal Society - HELECOS 8th Oct. 20-23,  2016. Thessaloniki. Greece
Publication year: 2016

Saplings of a hybrid larch F1 (Larix gmelinii var. japonica × L. kaempferi) grown under elevated O3 levels and treated with Ethylene diurea: a free-air-O3-enrichment experiment in northern East Asia

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Kita K., Paoletti E., Manning W.J., Saitanis C.J. and Koike T.
In: The 29th Task Force Meeting of the UNECE ICP Vegetation for Europe Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (Dubna, February 29 – March 4, 2016): Programme and Abstracts. – Dubna: JINR, 2016. – 22 p. ISBN: 978-5-9530-0433-6
Publication year: 2016

Olive oil for dressing plant leaves so as to avoid O3 injury

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J.,Stamatelopoulos D., Mouzaki-Paxinou A-Ch.,  Paoletti E., Manning W.J.
Water Air and Soil Pollution 227, Article number: 282
Publication year: 2016

Abstract

The persistence of high ground-level ozone (O3) concentration in most regions of the northern hemisphere has severe implications to crop production, wild plant conservation, and forest sustainability. Therefore, methods for plant protection against O3 and O3 biomonitoring are of high relevance; however, there is not a method that can be applied in cultivations, which are intended for human consumption. After spraying bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Pinto) seedlings with ethylene diurea, olive oil, or myclobutanil and exposing them to O3-enriched air (90 nmol mol−1) for a week (8 h day−1), we found that commercial olive oil can be effectively used as a protectant of plants against O3. This protection is attributed to avoidance of O3 uptake into the mesophyll, via decreased stomatal conductance. Olive oil can be applied even in organic cultivations, either for biomonitoring purposes or for short-term protection of plants during O3 episodes. Further studies are needed in order to investigate potential direct reaction of O3 with olive oil. Yet, attention should be paid when myclobutanil is applied to plants which are used for O3 biomonitoring purposes due to potential confounding effects by increasing O3-caused visible injury to plant leaves.

Interactive effect of Ethylenediurea, O3 pollution and insect grazing on willow saplings cultivated in a free-air-O3 system

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Koike T., Kanie S., Paoletti E., Manning W.J. and Saitanis C.J.
IUFRO Regional Congress for Asia and Oceania 2016, Air pollution and climate change impacts on forest ecosystems. 24-27 October 2016, Beijing, People's Republic of China
Publication year: 2016

Impacts of ethylene diurea (EDU) soil drench and foliar spray in Salix sachalinensis protection against O3-induced injury

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Paoletti E.,  Saitanis C.J., Manning W.J., Sugai T., Koike T.
Science of the Total Environement 573:1053-1062
Publication year: 2016

Abstract

It is widely accepted that elevated levels of surface ozone (O3) negatively affect plants. Ethylenediurea (EDU) is a synthetic substance which effectively protects plants against O3-caused phytotoxicity. Among other questions, the one still open is: which EDU application method is more appropriate for treating fast-growing tree species. The main aims of this study were: (i) to test if chronic exposure of Salix sachalinensis plants to 200–400 mg EDU L− 1, the usually applied range for protection against O3 phytotoxicity, is beneficial to plants; (ii) to evaluate the effects of chronic exposure to elevated O3 on S. sachalinensis; (iii) to assess the efficacy of two methods (i.e. soil drench and foliar spray) of EDU application to plants; (iv) to investigate the appropriate concentration of EDU to protect against elevated O3-induced damage in S. sachalinensis; and (v) to compare the two methods of EDU application in terms of effectiveness and EDU consumption. Current-year cuttings grown  in infertile soil free from organic matter were exposed either to low ambient O3 (AOZ, 10-h ≈ 28.3 nmol mol− 1) or to elevated O3 (EOZ, 10-h ≈ 65.8 nmol mol− 1) levels during daylight hours. Over the growing season, plants were treated every nine days with 200 mL soil drench of 0, 200 or 400 mg EDU L− 1 or with foliar spray of 0, 200 or 400 mg EDU L− 1 (in two separate experiments). We found that EDU per se had no effects on plants exposed to AOZ. EOZ practically significantly injured S. sachalinensis plants, and the impact was indifferent between the experiments. EDU did not protect plants against EOZ impact when applied as soil drench but it did protect them when applied as 200–400 mg L− 1 foliar spray. We conclude that EDU may be more effective against O3 phytotoxicity to fast-growing species when applied as a spray than when applied as a drench.

Keymessage: Soil-drenched EDU was ineffective in protecting willow plants against O3-induced injury, whereas foliar-sprayed EDU was effective even at the concentration of 200 mg L− 1.

Impact of organic practices on greenhouse gas emissions by three local faba bean landraces

International Conference
Vougeleka V., Ntatsi G., Pappa, V.A., Bebeli J.P., Saitanis C., Arapis G., Savvas D.
1st International Conference - Agroecology. 3-4 Oct. 2016. Athens, Greece
Publication year: 2016

High doses of ethylene diurea (EDU) are not toxic to willow and act as nitrogen fertilizer

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Paoletti E., Saitanis C.J., Manning W.J., Shi C., Koike T.
Science of the Total Envioronmet 566–567:841–850
Publication year: 2016

Abstract

Ethylene diurea (EDU) is synthetic chemical which protects plants against damage caused by ground level O3 and is used experimentally as a biomonitoring tool at doses usually ranging from 200 to 400 mg L− 1 a.i. Although several studies have investigated the protective action of EDU, this mechanism remains unclear. Important uncertainties in EDU action are whether EDU acts as a source of nitrogen (N) to plants and whether high doses are phytotoxic. In order to answer these questions, we conducted an open-field experiment where potted willow (Salix sachalinensis Fr. Schm) plants were exposed to ambient O3 conditions and treated with 0, 800 or 1600 mg L− 1 EDU as a soil drench, every nine days, for about 2.5 months. We examined approximately 50 response variables. Based on N content in different plant organs, we found that (a) all EDU was transferred to the leaves and (b) high doses of EDU increased the leaf N content. However, EDU did not affect the C content and distribution within the plant body. Still, even at the highest dose, EDU was not toxic to this fast-growing species (however such a high dose should not be applied in uncontrolled environments); and there was no EDU persistence in the soil, as indicated by soil N content. Notably, our soil was free from organic matter and N-poor.

Key message: EDU per se does not cause toxicity to willow plants when applied as drench to a soil with no organic matter, rather, high EDU doses may act as nitrogen fertilizer in a nitrogen-poor soil.

Growth, physiology and productivity of willow (Salix sachalinensis L.), an energy crop, exposed to Ethylene diurea and O3-enriched free air.

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Kanie S., Paoletti E., Manning W.J., Saitanis C.J., Satoh F. and Koike T.
In: The 29th Task Force Meeting of the UNECE ICP Vegetation for Europe Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (Dubna, February 29 – March 4, 2016): Programme and Abstracts. – Dubna: JINR, 2016. – 21 p. ISBN: 978-5-9530-0433-6
Publication year: 2016

Experimental comparison of two methods of ethylene di-urea application as to their efficacy to protect Salix udensis plants against O3 stress

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Sugai T., Paoletti E., Manning W.J., Saitanis C.J., Satoh F. and Koike T.
Committee on Air Pollution Effects Research on Mediterranean Ecosystems (CAPERmed) – II Meeting entitled “​(E)merging directions on air pollution and climate change research in the Mediterranean ecosystems". 28-30 June 2016, Brescia, Italy
Publication year: 2016

Effects of organic and conventional farming practices on greenhouse gas emissions in different pea landraces grown under Greek conditions

National Conference
Vougeleka V., Ntatsi G., Pappa, V.A., Bebeli J.P., Arapis G., Saitanis C., Savvas D. 
8th Congress of the Hellenic Ecologcal Society - HELECOS 8th. Oct. 20-23, 2016. Thessaloniki. Greece
Publication year: 2016

Effect of two ozone protectants on the metabolism of ozone-exposed plants of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris cv Pinto)

National Conference
Vougeleka V.J., Ntatsi G., Agathokleous E., Savvas D., Aliferis K.A., Saitanis C.J.
18th Panhellenic Phytopathology Conference. Oct. 18-21, 2016. Herakleion, Kriti, Greece
Publication year: 2016

A study on the response of 14 Cyprian wheat cultivars to elevated ozone dose.

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Agathokleous E., Pallides A., Bilalis D., Papadimitriou D., Vougeleka V., Karpouzis E., and Mouzaki-Paxinou A.-C.
In: The 29th Task Force Meeting of the UNECE ICP Vegetation for Europe Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (Dubna, JINR, February 29 – March 4, 2016): Programme and Abstracts. 31 p. ISBN: 978-5-9530-0433-6
Publication year: 2016

A review study on past 40 years of research on effects of tropospheric O3 on belowground structure, functioning and processes of trees: a linkage with potential ecological implications

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J., Watanabe M., Wang X. and Koike T.
Water Air and Soil Pollution 227: 33
Publication year: 2016
ABSTRACT
Woody plants constitute a great sink of carbon storage, mitigating thus the greenhouse effect phenomenon. They are considered key players in ecosystems, and among others, they help in decreasing soil erosion and in maintaining soil moisture. Over the last decades, researches have shown negative effects of the ambient ozone (O-3) on many woody species, not only on canopy but also on belowground part of trees. Negative effects of elevated O-3 (eO(3)), which usually refers to any O-3 dosages above the current ambient levels, on belowground structure, function, and processes may have consequences to ecosystem sustainability. We reviewed reports of research published over the past 40 years and dealing with woodies belowground response to eO(3). eO(3) induces changes in C dynamics into plants and alterations in their metabolism accordingly, as a result of different strategies followed by the trees in order to compensate with eO(3) stress effects. In these strategies, phenolics seem to have a detrimental role in shoot/root allometry. Root and soil chemical composition can be also influenced, threatening thus the soil biodiversity, soil fertility, and nutrient cycling. Elevated O-3 impact is discussed with linkage to other potential ecological consequences.

Wild plant species as subjects in O3 research

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J., Satoh F. , and Koike T.
Eurasian Journal of Forest Research. 18(1):1-36
Publication year: 2015

Abstract

Tropospheric ozone (O3) occurs in high concentrations nowadays and affects a many plant species in Northern hemisphere. Numerous wild plant species are known to be negatively affected by O3, and this may impact biodiversity and ecosystems in near future. Given the importance of O3 research with wild plants, we provide a list of 473 relevant taxa – that have been used as a subject of O3 research – as a research material, under various controlled-environment facilities, along with information about their response to O3. In addition, we include species which have been reported that they had developed ozone-like (but not confirmed) symptoms. This list of taxa along with the references is considered an important database, useful to researchers when planning their relevant investigations.

Tropospheric O3, the nightmare of wild plants: A review study

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J. and Koike T.
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology 71(2):142-155
Publication year: 2015

Abstract

 Ambient ozone (O3) poses a growing threat to the global ecosystems due to its high phytotoxicity: it may possibly reduce the productivity of wild plants as well as the species’ biodiversity. Asia hosts a remarkable number of wild plant species; thus, studies dealing with Asian species’ responses to O3 are of great importance. We have retrieved, from scientific databases, 195 papers dealing with the response of 473 wild plants species to O3. Some species we characterize as “ozonophobic” have been reported to be negatively affected by O3, even at O3 levels lower than the AOT40 threshold. This review revealed the lack of research dealing with the effects of O3 on endangered or threatened plant species, as well as on important medical plants. Such research is needed not only from an ecological point of view or in terms of biodiversity value, but also from an anthropocentric point of view. Several wild species carry unique substances that are used in medicines for healing human diseases or in agro-industry for the production of agrochemicals, thus securing human welfare.

Screening agrochemicals as potential protectants of plants against ozone phytotoxicity

Journal Paper
 Saitanis C.J., Lekkas D.V., Agathokleous E. and Flouri F.
Environmetal Pollution 197:247-255
Publication year: 2015

Abstract

Tropospheric ozone (O3) has long been documented to cause an injury to plants, but a plants’ protectant, widely applicable in agronomical practice, does not exist. We evaluated the potential antiozonate efficacy of the antitranspirant di-1-p-menthene (Vapor Gard) compared with ethylenediurea (EDU) on Bel-W3 tobacco plants. Plants were treated either with water, or by EDU (10, 100, and 500 mg dm−3), or by vapor (1, 5, 10, and 50 ml dm−3) and were exposed either to O3-enriched (90 ppb) or O3-free air, for 12 days and 8 h day−1. EDU when applied at 10 mg dm−3 did not protect the plants against O3, but when applied at 100 and 500 mg dm−3 offered a significant protection to the plants. Vapor, when applied at 1 ml dm−3 did not protect the plants against O3, neither by terms of foliar visible injury nor by terms of aboveground biomass. In addition, when applied at 10 and 50 ml dm−3 caused phytotoxicity to all the plants, which it was expressed as necrotic spots on the leaves’ surface, misshaping of the leaves, or short plants’ height. It is obvious that vapor does not protect Bel-W3 tobacco plants against O3. The antiozonate role of di-1-p-menthene is species-specific and probably occurs only under short-term exposures.

Integrated assessment of ambient ozone phytotoxicity in Greece’s Tripolis Plateau

Journal Paper
Saitanis C.J., Panagopoulos G., Dasopoulou V., Agathokleous E. and Papatheohari Y.
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology 71(2):55-64
Publication year: 2015
Abstract

 This is the first report of air pollution monitored in Greece’s Tripolis Plateau. We investigated ambient ozone concentrations and estimated its phytotoxicity potential based on three approaches: i) continuous instrumental monitoring at one station in the town, ii) phytodetection mapping with Bel-W3 tobacco plants in a network of 15 stations and iii) evaluation of ozone phytotoxicity by using the resistant (NC-R) and the sensitive (NC-S) white clover genotypes (the latter group was either sprayed or not sprayed with Ethylenediurea (EDU) or Azoxystrobin as ozone protectants).
The hourly ozone concentrations often exceeded 70 nmol mol-1. The average ozone concentration during the early afternoon hours (12:00-19:00) for June, July and August was 65.4 nmol mol-1. The monthly AOT40 (accumulated ozone mixing ratios over the threshold of 40 nmol mol-1) value was higher in July (9,123 nmol mol-1 h) and lower in October (2,022 nmol mol-1 h).
The Bel-W3 plants showed characteristic ozone-induced visible foliar injury symptoms at all the stations of the network, suggesting that ozone was at phytotoxic levels not only in the town, where it was measured, but also throughout the plateau.
The white clover revealed a reduction of the epigeous biomass of the NC-S by 36-57% in five harvests. The application of EDU prevented biomass reduction in the NC-S genotype, while Azoxystrobin did not offer significant protection.
These results indicate that, in rural areas of Greece, ambient ozone occurs at potentially phytotoxic levels, at least for sensitive plant species.

Influence of ozone on R123-S158 snap bean biotypes under ambient air in Athens, Greece.

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J. and Bari S.M.
28th Task Force Meeting of the UNECE ICP Vegetation & ozone workshop. Feb. 3-5, 2015, Rome, Italy. Programme and Abstracts. p. 74
Publication year: 2015

Impact of elevated O3 on growth, physiology and production of willow (Salix sachalinensis L.), an energy crop, and the role of Ethylene di-urea: a  free-air-O3 system

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Kanie S., Paoletti E., Manning W.J., Saitanis C.J., Satoh F., and Koike T.
3rd International Life-Science Symposium. 26 November 2015, Sapporo, Japan
Publication year: 2015

Growth responses of a willow to free-air-O3 fumigation and EDU: A preliminary report

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Paoletti E., Manning W.J., Saitanis C.J., Satoh F. and Koike T.
The 27th international biennial conference of the IUFRO Research Group 7.01 “Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Change on Forest Ecosystems” entitled “Global Challenges of Air Pollution and Climate Change to Forests”. June 2-5, 2015, Nice, France.
Publication year: 2015

Ethylenediurea (EDU) as a protectant of plants against O3

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., T. Koike, C.J. Saitanis, M. Watanabe, Y. Hoshika, and F. Satoh
Eurasian Journal of Forest Research. 18(1): 37-50
Publication year: 2015

Ethylenediurea (EDU) is an anti-ozonant substance that is recognized as a versatile research tool, and recently attracts increasing interest. As many wild plant species are forced into complex responses by tropospheric ozone (O3), these responses are crucial for the functioning of ecosystems and consequently for the biosphere; thus, countermeasures are required. A plethora of substances have been evaluated as to their effectiveness in protecting plants against O3. EDU is the most widely-used substance in O3 research, in order to moderate O3 effects on plant growth. We present a synoptic table with recent literature on EDU applications to plants as a protectant against O3. This table summarizes  important information on these publications, and we hope to be useful to researchers intended to employ EDU in their research with wild plants, but also to researchers working with air pollution control and other scientists.

Ethylene-di-urea (EDU), an effective phytoprotectant against O3 deleterious effects and a valuable research tool

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E., Koike T., Watanabe M., Hoshika Y. and Saitanis C.J.
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology 71(3):185-195
Publication year: 2015

Effects of ethylenediurea (EDU) on clonal seedlings of a hybrid larch F1 (Larix gmelinii var. japonica × L. kaempferi) grown under elevated O3: An experiment in northern East Asia

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Shi C., Kita K., Paoletti E., Saitanis C.J., Manning W.J.
1st Asian Air Pollution workshop. 31 October – 2 November 2015, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Publication year: 2015

Current knowledge on EDU (Ethylene-di-urea), the most effective antiozonant

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J., Watanabe M., Hoshika Y. and Koike T.
28th Task Force Meeting of the UNECE ICP Vegetation & ozone workshop. Feb. 3-5, 2015, Rome, Italy. Programme and Abstracts. p. 54
Publication year: 2015

Volatile compounds in Thymus sect. Teucrioides (Lamiaceae): intraspecific and interspecific diversity, chemotaxonomic significance and exploitation potential

Journal Paper
Pitarokili D., Constantinidis Th.,  Saitanis C.J.and  Tzakou O.
Chemistry and Biodiversity 11:593-618
Publication year: 2014

Abstract

Thymus sect. Teucrioides comprises three species, namely, T. hartvigii, T. leucospermus, and T. teucrioides, distributed in Greece and Albania. The volatile constituents of all species of the section were obtained by hydrodistillation and investigated by GC‐FID and GC/MS analyses. Twenty populations were sampled and a total of 103 compounds were identified, representing 98.0–99.9% of the oil compositions. The oils were mainly characterized by high contents of monoterpene hydrocarbons (42.7–92.4%), with the exception of three oils for which oxygenated monoterpenes were the dominating constituents, viz., that of T. hartvigii ssp. macrocalyx, with linalool as main compound (89.2±0.5%), and those of T. hartvigii ssp. hartvigii and of one population of T. teucrioides ssp. candilicus, containing thymol as major component (46.4±3.1 and 38.2±3.9%, resp.). The most common compound in the oils of the 20 populations of the section was p‐cymene. Considerable variation was detected within and among populations, and seven chemotypes were distinguished, i.e., p‐cymene, linalool, p‐cymene/thymol, p‐cymene/γ‐terpinene, p‐cymene/borneol, p‐cymene/γ‐terpinene/borneol, and p‐cymene/linalool chemotypes. Different chemotypes may exist in the same population. Multivariate statistical analyses enabled the segregation of the oils within Thymus sect. Teucrioides into two groups, one consisting of the three subspecies of T. teucrioides and the second comprising the species T. hartvigii and T. leucospermus. A linalool‐rich chemotype, unique within the section, distinguished the oil of T. hartvigii ssp. macrocalyx from all other oils. The high oil content of p‐cymene and the preference for serpentine substrates render T. teucrioides species promising for future exploitation.

Screening of Bangladeshi winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars for sensitivity to ozone

Journal Paper
Saitanis C.J., Bari S.M., Burkey K.O., Stamatelopoulos D., Agathokleous E.
Environmental Science and Pollution Research 21:13560-13571
Publication year: 2014

Abstract

The sensitivity to ozone of ten Bangladeshi wheat cultivars was tested by exposing plants to eight ozone exposure regimes (50, 60, 80, 100, 120, 135, 150, and 200 ppb for 14, 11, 8, 6, 5, 4, 3, and 1 days, respectively, for 8 h/day) in controlled environment chambers. Visible leaf injury, dry weight, chlorophyll, carotenoid content, leaf greenness (SPAD value), quantum yield of photosynthesis, and stomatal resistance were measured to evaluate response. Shoot biomass, total chlorophyll, leaf greenness, and carotenoid content were reduced in ozone-exposed plants. Based on the results of principal component analysis (PCA)-biplot analysis, the order of sensitivity to ozone was: Akbar >> Sufi ≥ Bijoy ≥ Shatabdi > Bari-26 ≥ Gourab > Bari-25 ≥ Prodip ≥ Sourav >> Kanchan. The most important parameters to discriminate cultivars with respect to ozone sensitivity were visible injury and chlorophyll b/a ratio, whereas quantum yield of photosynthesis was less important. Differences in stomatal resistance were not a significant factor in ozone response. Regression of cultivars’ PCA scores against year of release revealed no trend, suggesting that ozone tolerance was not incorporated during cultivar breeding.

Research proposal for moderating ground-surface ozone on representative plant species native to Greece and Japan

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J., Watanabe M., Hoshika Y., Satoh F., and Koike. T.
IUFRO, International Conference on O3 and Plants. Beijing, China, May 18-21, 2014. Guideline and Abstracts, p. 1
Publication year: 2014

Ozone in the lower atmosphere threatens wild flora

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J. and Koike T.
2nd International Life-Science Symposium for Young Scientist. Sapporo, Japan, Oct. 23, 2014.
Publication year: 2014

Impact of ground-level ozone (O3) on woody plants’ roots

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Wang X., Watanabe M., Saitanis C.J., Satoh F. and Koike T. 
6th International Symposium on Physiological Processes in Roots of Woody Plants. Nagoya, Japan, Sep.8-13, 2014
Publication year: 2014

Scientific Report
Velissariou D., Saitanis C.J., Karandinos M.G., Riga-Karandinos A.N., Lekkas D., Agathokleous E.
In: Harmens H. and Mills G. (Editors). Deposition to and impacts on vegetation in (South-East Europe, Caucasus, Central Asia (EECCA/SEE) and South-East Asia. Report prepared by the ICP Vegetation. Pages 59-60
Publication year: 2014

Evaluation of pinolene as protectant against ozone phytotoxicity

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J. and Papatheohari Y. 
27th Task Force Meeting of the ICP Vegetation. Jan. 28-30, 2014, Paris, France. Book of Abstracts, p. 52.
Publication year: 2014

Evaluation of di-1-p-menthene as antiozonant on Bel-W3 tobacco plants, as compared with ethylenediurea

Journal Paper
Agathokleous E.,  Saitanis C.J. and Papatheohari Y.
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution 225, 2139
Publication year: 2014

Abstract

Tropospheric ozone (O3) has long been documented to cause an injury to plants, but a plants’ protectant, widely applicable in agronomical practice, does not exist. We evaluated the potential antiozonate efficacy of the antitranspirant di-1-p-menthene (Vapor Gard) compared with ethylenediurea (EDU) on Bel-W3 tobacco plants. Plants were treated either with water, or by EDU (10, 100, and 500 mg dm−3), or by vapor (1, 5, 10, and 50 ml dm−3) and were exposed either to O3-enriched (90 ppb) or O3-free air, for 12 days and 8 h day−1. EDU when applied at 10 mg dm−3 did not protect the plants against O3, but when applied at 100 and 500 mg dm−3 offered a significant protection to the plants. Vapor, when applied at 1 ml dm−3 did not protect the plants against O3, neither by terms of foliar visible injury nor by terms of aboveground biomass. In addition, when applied at 10 and 50 ml dm−3 caused phytotoxicity to all the plants, which it was expressed as necrotic spots on the leaves’ surface, misshaping of the leaves, or short plants’ height. It is obvious that vapor does not protect Bel-W3 tobacco plants against O3. The antiozonate role of di-1-p-menthene is species-specific and probably occurs only under short-term exposures.

Ethylene-di-urea: the ambrosia of plants against ozone air pollutant: free-air ozone enrichment (FACE) experiments in Northern Japan

International Conference
Agathokleous E., Saitanis C.J. and  Koike T.
2nd International Life-Science Symposium for Young Scientist. Sapporo, Japan, Oct. 23, 2014.
Publication year: 2014

Biomonitoring of heavy metals in playgrounds in Athens, Greece.

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Lappa K., Ntatsi G., Barouchas P. and Agathokleous E.
27th Task Force Meeting of the ICP Vegetation. Jan. 28-30, 2014, Paris, France. Book of Abstracts, p. 71
Publication year: 2014

Studies on the Effect of some Inorganic and Organic Substances against Ozone Damage of Sensitive Crops.

International Conference
Bari M.S., aitanis C.J. Sand Stamatelopoulos D.C.
International Training Workshop on Extreme Weather and Climate Events. July 14-23, 2013, Beijing, China. Book of Abstracts, p. 39.
Publication year: 2013

Spatiotemporal distribution of airborne elements monitored with the moss bags technique in the greater Thriasion plain, Attica, Greece

Journal Paper
Saitanis C.J., Frontasyeva M.V., Steinnes E., Palmer M.W.,  Ostrovnaya T.M., Gundorina S.F.
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 185(1):955-68
Publication year: 2013

Abstract

The well-known moss bags technique was applied in the heavily polluted Thriasion Plain region, Attica, Greece, in order to study the spatiotemporal distribution, in the atmosphere, of the following 32 elements: Na, Al, Cl, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Zn, As, Se, Br, Sr, Mo, Sb, I, Ba, La, Ce, Sm, Tb, Dy, Yb, Hf, Ta, Hg, Th, and U. The moss bags were constituted of Sphagnum girgensohnii materials. The bags were exposed to ambient air in a network of 12 monitoring stations scattered throughout the monitoring area. In order to explore the temporal variation of the pollutants, four sets of moss bags were exposed for 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Instrumental neutral activation analysis was used for the determinations of the elements. The data were analyzed using the Pearson correlations, the partial redundancy analysis, and the biplot statistical methods. Some pairs of elements were highly correlated indicating a probable common source of origin. The levels of the measured pollutants were unevenly distributed throughout the area and different pollutants exhibited different spatial patterns. In general, higher loads were observed in the stations close to and within the industrial zone. Most of the measured elements (e.g., Al, Ca, Ni, I, Zn, Cr, and As) exhibited a monotonic accumulation trend over time. Some elements exhibited different dynamics. The elements Mn, Mo, and Hg showed a decreasing trend, probably due to leaching and/or volatilization processes over time. Na and Br initially showed an increasing trend during the winter and early spring periods but decreased drastically during the late warm period. The results further suggest that the moss bags technique would be considered valuable for the majority of elements but should be used with caution in the cases of elements vulnerable to leaching and/or volatilization. It also suggests that the timing and the duration of the exposure of moss materials should be considered in the interpretation of the results.

Tropospheric ozone biomonitoring with snap bean plants in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Booker F.L., Silva E., Burkey K.O.
25th Task Force Meeting of the ICP Vegetation. 31 Jan.-2 Feb., 2012, Brescia, Italy. Book of Abstracts, p. 20.
Publication year: 2012

Screening of ten Bangladeshi wheat varieties for their sensitivity to ozone

International Conference
Bari M.S., Saitanis C.J. and Stamatelopoulos D.C.
25th Task Force Meeting of the ICP Vegetation. 31 Jan-2 Feb. 2012, Brescia, Italy. Book of Abstracts, p. 45.
Publication year: 2012

Assessment of the snap bean ozone bioindicator system under different management regimes

International Conference
Burkey O.K, Booker L.F., Saitanis C.J., Ainsworth A.E. , and Nelson L.R. 
25th Task Force Meeting of the ICP Vegetation. Jan 31.-Feb. 2, 2012, Brescia, Italy. Book of Abstracts, p. 20.
Publication year: 2012

Testing the response of some Egyptian plant species to ozone

International Conference
Mashaheet A.M.,Saitanis C.J., Madkour S. and Zahran A.A. 
24th Task Force Meeting of the ICP Vegetation. Rapperswil, Switzerland. Jan. 31st - Feb.2nd, 2011. Book of Abstracts p. 48.
Publication year: 2011

Revitalization of urban ecosystems through vascular plants: preliminary results from the BSEC-PDF project

Journal Paper
Gorelova S.V., Frontasyeva M.V.,  Yurukova L., Coşkun M., Pantelica A., Saitanis C.J., Tomaševć M. and Aničić M.
Agrochimica 55(2):65-84
Publication year: 2011

Egyptian bean genotypes as ozone bioindicators

International Conference
Madkour S.A., Saitanis C.J., Saad E.M. 
Proceedings of the 24th Task Force Meeting of the UNECE ICP Vegetation, Jan. 31st - Feb.2nd, 2011 - Rapperswil, Switzerland.
Publication year: 2011

A new Egyptian common bean O3 bioindicator pair comparable in performance to the (S156/R123) system

International Conference
Mashaheet A.M., Saitanis C.J., Madkour S. and Zahran A.A.
24th Task Force Meeting of the ICP Vegetation. Rapperswil, Switzerland. Jan. 31st - Feb.2nd, 2011. Book of Abstracts, p. 24
Publication year: 2011

Revitalization of urban ecosystems through vascular plants: preliminary results from the BSEC-RDF project

International Conference
Frontasyeva M.V., Gorelova S.V., Yurukova L., Coskun M., Pantelica A., Saitanis C.J., Tomasevic M., Anicic M.
In: International conference on Environmental Pollution and Clean bio/phytoremediation.  Book of Abstracts, p. 25. Pisa, Italy. 16-19 June, 2010.
Publication year: 2010

Population Ecology - Population Dynamics

Book
Saitanis C.J. and Karandinos M.G.
Embryo Publisher, Athens, Greece. p. 400. ISBN: 9789608002265 (In Greek language)
Publication year: 2010

Management and Protection of the Environment

Scientific Note
Saitanis C.J., Riga-Karandinos A.N., and Arapis G.
Addressed to the students of the 5th semester of the Agricultural University of Athens in the framework of the course "Notes on the Management and Protection of the Environment”.
Publication year: 2010

Trace elements monitoring with moss bags in Greece

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Frontasyeva M.V., and Steinnes E.
5th International Workshop on Biomonitoring of Air Pollution.  Sep. 20-24, 2009 - Buenos Aires – Argentina. Book of Abstracts.
Publication year: 2009

Structure of the Aphid Communities of Greece

International Conference
Karandinos M.G., Saitanis C.J., Katis N., and Tsitsipis J.
European Ecological Congress. Sep. 18-23, 1999. Halkidiki, Greece. pp. 177.
Publication year: 2009

Biomonitoring of air quality using plants

International Conference
Coskun M., Frontasyeva M.V., Gorelova S.V., Pantelica A., Saitanis C.J., Tomasevic M.,   Yurukova L.
5th International Workshop on Biomonitoring of Air Pollution [BioMAP-5], p.21. Sep. 20-24, 2009 - Buenos Aires – Argentina
Publication year: 2009

 

Biomonitoring of air quality using plants

International Conference
Coskun M., Frontasyeva M.V., Gorelova S.V., Pantelica A., Saitanis C.J., Tomasevic M. and Yurukova L.
178th International Seminar on Interaction of Neutrons with Nuclei: "Fundamental Interactions & Neutrons, Nuclear Structure, Ultracold Neutrons, Related Topics" Dubna, Russia, May 27-30, 2009.
Publication year: 2009

Ambient air monitoring with moss bags technique in Thriassion Plain, Attika, Greece

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Frontasyeva M.V., Steinnes E., Ostrovnaya T.M., Gundorina S.F. and  Tzamgiozis L.
In “The 22nd Task Force Meeting of the UNECE ICP Vegetation. Feb. 2-5, Braunschweig, Germany.  Book of Abstracts p.53
Publication year: 2009

Ambient air monitoring using the moss bag technique in the Thriassion Plain, Attika, Greece

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Frontasyeva M.V., Steinnes E., Ostrovnaya T.M., Gundorina S.F. and Tzamgiozis L.
178th International Seminar on Interaction of Neutrons with Nuclei: "Fundamental Interactions & Neutrons, Nuclear Structure, Ultracold Neutrons, Related Topics" Dubna, Russia, May 27-30, 2009. p. 56.
Publication year: 2009

Tropospheric Ozone: a Menace for Crops and Natural Vegetation in Greece

Journal Paper
Saitanis C.J.
Italian Journal of Agronomy 3(1):71-77
Publication year: 2008

ABSTRACT

Based on instrumental monitoring (AOT40s) and phytodetection (with Bel-W3 and KK6/5 tobacco cultivars) data we evaluated ambient ozone phytotoxicity in Greece. In the greater region of Mesogia-Attica, during the summer of 2000, the year before the new airport Eleftherios Venizelos (March 2001) began operating in this region, the AOT40s (ppb*h) were 16,325 over 110 days at Spata; 18,646 over 113 days at Markopoulo; 8,093 over 22 days at Artemis and 16,679 over 121 days in Athens. The Bel- W3 and KK6/5 plants were extensively injured at all places with the greatest injury occurring at Artemis. During the same summer, ozone was also monitored in three rural areas of Corinth, at the Astronomical Observatory of Krionerion, Bogdani Hill and Kiato; The highest average daily AOT40 (192 ppb*h) was observed in Krionerio, and it was almost equal to that occurred in Athens (193 ppb*h). Bel-W3 and KK6/5 plants placed at 11 rural areas in Corinth showed extended injury. The following year (2001), high injury was observed on other sets of bioindicator plants exposed in a network of 28 locations throughout the greater area of Volos and Pelion Mountain. Symptoms were more severe at Mortias, Xinovrisi, Tsagarada, Makrinitsa and Chania. The AOT40 (May-July) was 11,391 and 10,351 ppb*hours for 2001 and 2002 respectively. Severe ozone-like symptoms have also been observed on field-cultivated grape vines, onion and watermelon plants. Synoptically, our investigations suggest that ozone occurs in the Greek mainland at levels that are potentially phytotoxic for sensitive crop species and for sensitive natural vegetation species including forest trees.

Mites associated with stored products in Greece

Journal Paper
Palyvos N.E., Emmanouel N.G., and Saitanis C.J.
Experimental and Applied Acarology 44:213–226
Publication year: 2008

Insecticidal effect of ozone against Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrychidae), Sitophilus oryzea (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Tribolium confusum Jacquelin Du Val (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae): Influence of Commodity

International Conference
Athanassiou, C.G., Milonas, D.N. Saitanis C.J.
Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Controlled Atmosphere and Fumigation in Stored Products (Eds. G. Daolinc, S. Navarro, Y. Jian, T. Cheng, J. Zuxun, L. Yue, L. Yang & W. Haipeng). Chengdu, China, Sichuan Publishing House of Science & Technology, p.61-71
Publication year: 2008

Tropospheric ozone: a menace for crops and natural vegetation in Greece

International Conference
Saitanis C.J.
International workshop Ozone Risk Assessment for European Vegetation, Anacapri, Naples, Italy. May 10-11, 2007
Publication year: 2007

Screening agrochemicals as potential protectants of plants against ozone phytotoxicity

International Conference
Saitanis C.J. and Lekkas D.
20th Task Force Meeting of the ICP Vegetation. Dubna, Russia.  Mar. 5-9, 2007. p. 66
Publication year: 2007

Parazitske ose (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae) u jugoistoĉnoj evropi: diverzitet trofiĉkih asocijacija

International Conference
Tomanović Ţ., Kavallieratos N.G., Saitanis C.J., Starý P., Petrović-Obradović O., Ćetković A. and Athanassiou C.G.
Simpozijum Entomologa Srbije 2007, Uţice, 26-30.09.2007, Plenarni referati i rezimei, 61.
Publication year: 2007

Ozone and MeBr: good and bad aspects

International Conference
Saitanis C.J.
International Workshop on Food Safety in a Sustainable Postharvest System of Agricultural Products. Kahramanmaraş Sütçü İmam University, Kahramanmaraş, Turkey, Oct. 16-18, 2007
Publication year: 2007

Investigation of the efficacy of spinosad against Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in wheat and maize

National Conference
Milonas D. N., Athanasiou Ch.G., Markoglou A.N., Saitanis C.J. andBouchelos K.Th.
12th Panhellenic Entomological Congress. Larnaca, Nov. 13-16, 2007. Cyprus
Publication year: 2007

Instrumental monitoring and phytodetection of tropospheric ozone in the greater region of Tripoli - Greece

International Conference
Saitanis C.J.
20th Task Force Meeting of the ICP Vegetation. Dubna, Russia. Mar. 5-9, 2007. p. 65
Publication year: 2007

Efficacy of repeated trickle applications of oxalic acid in syrup for varroosis control in Apis mellifera: influence of meteorological conditions and presence of brood

Journal Paper
Bacandritsos N., Papanastasiou I., Saitanis C.J., Nanetti A., and Roinioti E.
Veterinary Parasitology 14(2.1):174-178
Publication year: 2007

Effectiveness of bitterbarkomycin against Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrychidae), Prostephanus truncatus (Horn) (Coleoptera: Bostrychidae) and Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in stored maize

International Conference
Milonas D., Athanassiou C.G., Maistrou S. and Saitanis C.J.
In the proceedings of the IOBC - Working Group “Integrated Protection of Stored Products” Aug. 20–23, 2007. Poznan, Poland. pp: 261-266.
Publication year: 2007

Effect of two azadirachtin formulations against adults of Sitophilus oryzae and Tribolium confusum on different grain commodities.

Journal Paper
Kavallieratos N.G., Athanassiou Ch.G., Saitanis C.J., Kontodimas D.C., Roussos A.N., Tsoutsa M.S. and Anastassopoulou U.A.
Journal of Food Protection 70(7):1627-1632
Publication year: 2007

Aphid parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, and Aphidiinae) in southeastern Europe: in a search for a pattern of their trophic associations

International Conference
Tomanović Ţ., Kavallieratos N.G., Saitanis C.J., Stary P., Petrović-Obradović O.,  Ćetković A. and Athanassiou C.G.
Ecology of Aphidophaga 10, Sept.5-10, 2007, Athens, Greece. Abstracts, PL10.
Publication year: 2007

An interview about “the effects of ozone on cultivated species”

TV-Interview
Saitanis C.J.
Broadcasted on Oct. 13, 2007,  by  the TV Channel ET-1 – in the program titled: “Greek Gea” and  on Oct. 14,2007, by the TV Channel ERT3  – in the program titled: “About Earth”
Publication year: 2007

"Ozone hole" in cultivation.

Newspaper Interview
Saitanis C.J.
TA NEA. Aug. 27, 2007.(An interview)  
Publication year: 2007

Ιnstrumental monitoring and phytodetection of tropospheric ozone in the greater region of Tripoli – Greece

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Panagopoulos G., Dasopoulou V. and Arapis G.
In the proceedings of the "8th Conference on Meteorology - Climatology and Atmospheric Physics" Agricultural University of Athens, Greece. May, 2006. pp: 289-293
Publication year: 2006

Three non-toxic insect traps useful in trapping wasps’ enemies of honey bees

Journal Paper
Bacandritsos N., I. Papanastasiou Saitanis C.J., Roinioti E.
Bulletin of Insectology 59(2):135-145
Publication year: 2006

Study of the weekday-weekend variation of air pollutants in a typical Mediterranean coastal town

Journal Paper
Riga-karandinos A.N., Saitanis C.J., and  Arapis G.
International Journal of Environment and Pollution 27(4): 300-312
Publication year: 2006

Abstract:

A study of the air pollution in the Greek coastal town Volos was performed using the available data of the last ten years. Quantile analysis showed that ozone concentrations during weekends were higher by 5–10% in comparison to those on weekdays, while the inverse was observed for the other pollutants, indicating the occurrence of the so called |weekend effect|. Analysis of the maximum values of the high ozone period showed even higher differences. The pollutants NO, NO2, CO, and SO2 were lower during weekends compared to weekdays, by about 30%, 20%, 25% and 10% respectively.

Study of ozone effects on plants

National Conference
Saitanis C.J., Lekka D., Panagopoulos G., Ntasopoulou B., Komninos P., Tzamgiozis L.
Workshop on the Institutional Project EPEAEK II "Environment-Pythagoras-Support of Research Teams of AUA. Athens, April 5, 2006.
Publication year: 2006

Special Topics and Exercises of Ecology

Scientific Note
Saitanis C.J.
Addressed to the students of the 7th semester of the Agricultural University of Athens in the framework of the course "Special Topics in Ecology"
Publication year: 2006

Spatiotemporal clustering and association of Ephestia kuehniella (Pyralidae: Lepidoptera) and two of its parasitoids in bulk-stored wheat

Journal Paper
Athanassiou Ch. G., and Saitanis C.J.
Journal of Economic Entomology 99(6):2191–2201
Publication year: 2006

Abstract

To assess the spatiotemporal distribution of insects in a flat storage containing wheat (Triticumn spp.), probe traps were suspended in the wheat bulk and inspected for captured insects at 15-d intervals, from June 2001 to August 2002. The grain bulk was 1 m in height, and traps were placed at the upper and the lower 0.5 m of the bulk. During the entire trapping period, 17 insect taxa were recorded. The most abundant species were Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and its larval parasitoids Harbobracon hebetor (Say) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and Venturia canescens (Gravenhorst) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae). Most individuals were found in the upper bulk part. The highest E. kuehniella trap catches were found between August and November 2001 and during June and July 2002. Of the two parasitoids, H. hebetor was more abundant than V. canescens, with the exception of winter and early spring, when both species occurred at low numbers, especially H. hebetor. Spatial analysis by distance indices (SADIE) spatiotemporal analysis showed significant clustering of species, especially during summer and autumn. Early in the season and during spring 2002, at low host numbers, V. canescens occupied the locations where E. kuehniella mainly aggregated, but with the increase of E. kuehniella population, H. hebetor occupied these host groups and replaced V canescens. Although the two parasitoids competed for the same host species, both species coexisted in the storage facility during the entire trapping period.

Physico-chemical characteristics of Greek fir honeydew honey from Marchalina hellenica (Gen.) in comparison to other Mediterranean honeydew honeys

Journal Paper
Bacandritsos N.,  Sabatini A.G., Papanastasiou I., and Saitanis C.J.
Italian Journal of Food Science 18:21-31
Publication year: 2006

Ozone: a new phytotoxic menace in Greece

International Conference
Saitanis C.J.
In the proceedings of the 8th Conference on Meteorology - Climatology and Atmospheric Physics. Agricultural University of Athens, Greece. May, 2006. pp: 284-288
Publication year: 2006

Impact of endemic geochemical peculiarities of the Balkans on population health studied through soil, water and air analysis

International Conference
Stamenov J., Yurukova L., Spiric Z., Papastefanou C., Saitanis C.J. et al.
Proceedings of the International Conference on Regional Environmental Issues Cooperation Avenues. Turkey, Izmir, Oct. 19-21, 2006
Publication year: 2006

, 2006.

First study of anthropogenic platinum group elements in roadside top-soils in Athens, Greece

Journal Paper
Riga-Karandinos A.N., Saitanis C.J., and Arapis G.
Water, Air & Soil Pollution 172:3-20
Publication year: 2006

Abstract

Concentrations of Pt and Pd in roadside top-soil samples, collected in May 2003, at four types of sites (urban, suburban, rural and highway) in the greater Athens area as well as concentrations of Pb, Cu, Zn, Fe and Ca, were determined. Our results show high concentrations of “classic” (Pb, Cu, Zn) and “new” (Pt, Pd) traffic related elements in top-soils on a highway and a representative urban street in Athens. In the highway samples, the average concentrations of Pt and Pd were 141.1 and 125.9 ng/g respectively, while in the urban street samples they were 35% lower. In the samples of the rural and suburban roads the Pt and Pd levels were very low 2.0 and 1.4 ng/g respectively. These data show an increased accumulation of Pt and Pd in top-soils during the last decade as a result of the gradual increase in the use of vehicles with catalytic converters. The Pt:Pd ratios (average: 1.2) were consistent with known catalytic converters composition (1–2.5), suggesting that the common source of these metals is catalytic converters. The levels of the traffic related elements in suburban and rural roads were very low, suggesting the negligible impact from emission sources. Principal component, biplot and cluster analysis discriminated the traffic related metals from Fe, Mn and Ca, which are abundant in soils, related mainly to the soil parent materials.

Studio comparative su sei formulati contenenti timolo nel controllo di Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) in Grecia [Comparison between six thymol based formulations in the control of Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) in Greece]

Journal Paper
Nanetti A.,  Bacandritsos N.,  Papanastasiou I., Saitanis C.J., and  Papadoulis G.Th. 
APOidea 2:126-133
Publication year: 2005

PGEs in Roadside Soils from Athens Metropolitan Area (Greece)

International Conference
Riga–Karandinos A.N., Saitanis C.J. and Panagopoulos G.
Ιn: e-Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology. Vol. A, pages A1247–A1255. 1-3 Sept. 2005. Rhodes Island, Greece
Publication year: 2005

Ozone biomonitoring with white clover in Athens, Greece

International Conference
Saitanis C.J.,  Riga-Karandinos A.N., Katsaras D.H., and Tzamgiozis L. 
In: e-Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology. Vol. B, pages B797-B802. Sept. 1-3, 2005. Rhodes Island, Greece
Publication year: 2005

Greece is swimming in ozone

Newspaper Interview
Saitanis C.J.
ETHNOS TIS KYRIAKIS. Dec. 24-25, 2005 “”. pages  56-57 (An Interview)
Publication year: 2005

Ecology and Political‑ecology (Οικολογία και Πολιτ[ο]ικολογία)

Newspaper Interview
Saitanis C.J.
KRAMA. Feb. 18. 2005. (A magazine inlaid in the CITY PRESS newspaper). “Ecology and political‑ecology”. An answer to a provocative article, written by a Politician, appeared in the previous issue, titled “Breaking the myths of Ecology”
Publication year: 2005

Comparative Assessment of Ambient Air Quality in two typical Mediterranean Coastal Cities in Greece

Journal Paper
Riga-Karandinos A.N., and Saitanis C.J.
Chemosphere 59:1125-1136
Publication year: 2005

Abstract

Air quality data (O3, NO2, NO, CO and SO2) of two Greek coastal cities, Patras and Volos, were analyzed and compared to evaluate: (a) the exceedances of air quality EU threshold values, (b) the diurnal patterns of air pollutants and (c) the “weekend effect” on ozone levels.

High ozone levels, close to the thresholds for human health and clearly above the threshold for the protection of plants and ecosystems, were observed in Volos. O3 levels in Volos were higher than those in Patras. NOx levels in Patras were significantly higher than the limits for human health and plants’ protection. Both, NOx and SO2 levels were higher in Patras than in Volos. The Patras’ harbor high traffic seems to drive the diurnal pattern of SO2 in that city.

The examination of the rate of ozone accumulation, during the high O3 period (Apr.–Sep.), revealed the occurrence of two phases, a fast and a slow one, with different durations in each city. We suggest that the occurrence of such two phases’ patterns should be considered in relevant ozone studies.

In both towns, the O3 levels were higher during weekends in comparison to midweek days, although NO levels were lower. Our results support the hypothesis that the weekend O3 effect is due to a combination of VOC sensitivity of the studied areas and the reduced NOx emissions during weekends. Based on the comparison of the weekend effect in the two cities, we suggest the occurrence of a feedback mechanism between peri-urban natural ecosystems (forests) and the polluting anthropogenic ones (cities).

Keywords

Air pollution, Urban pollution, Weekend effect, NOx, SO2, CO, O3, Monthly variation, Seasonal variation

Catalytic...pollution

Newspaper Interview
Riga-Karandinos A.N. and Saitanis C.J.
TA NEA. Oct. 26.  2005. An Interview on new pollutants of platinum group elements.
Publication year: 2005

An interview about the Pollution from platinum group elements

Radio Interview
Saitanis C.J.
Browcasted on Oct. 27, 2005, by the  Radio Station of the Municipality of Athens – 984 FM.
Publication year: 2005

Ozone: a new severe phytotoxic pollutant in Greece

International Conference
Saitanis C.J.
In: Book of Abstracts of the Advanced Research Workshop: “Ecotoxicology, Ecological Risk Assessment and Multiple Stressors”. Oct. 13-16, 2004. Poros, Greece
Publication year: 2004

 

 

Ozone is threatening the vegetation in rural areas

Newspaper Interview
Saitanis C.J.
THE NATIONAL HERALD. Jan. 3. 2004. ( A newspaper Circulating in US – addressed to Greek minority in US; An interview about ozone phytotoxicity in Greece)
Publication year: 2004

New generation … catalytic pollutants

Newspaper Interview
TA NEA Dec. 27.  2004. page 66. (An Interview)
Publication year: 2004

Morphology and life cycle of Marchalina hellenica (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: argarodidae) on pine (Parnis Mt.) and fir (Helmos Mt.) forests of Greece

Journal Paper
Bacandritsos N., Saitanis C.J., PapanastasiouJ. , and Papadopoulos G.
Annales De La Societe Entomologique de France 40(2):169-176
Publication year: 2004

Long term monitoring tropospheric ozone in Kyiv (Ukraine): formation, temporal patterns and potential adverse effects

International Conference
Blum O., Saitanis C.J.
In: Book of Abstracts of the Advanced Research Workshop: “Ecotoxicology, Ecological Risk Assessment and Multiple Stressors”. Oct. 13-16, 2004. Poros, Greece
Publication year: 2004

Exploring ambient ozone concentrations and evaluating its phytotoxicity, over the growing season, in selected urban and rural areas in Greece, Poland and Ukraine

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Godzik B., Blum O. and Riga-Karandinos A.N.
In: Book of Abstracts of the Advanced Research Workshop: “Ecotoxicology, Ecological Risk Assessment and Multiple Stressors”. Oct. 13-16, 2004. Poros, Greece
Publication year: 2004

Evaluation of Ozone Phytotoxicity in the Greater Area of a Typical Mediterranean Small City (Volos) and in the Nearby Forest (Pelion Mt.) - Central Greece

Journal Paper
Saitanis C.J.,  Katsaras D.H., Riga-KarandinosA.N., Lekkas D.B. and Arapis G.
Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 72(6):1268-77
Publication year: 2004

 2004. . 

Effects of Ozone on physiological parameters of nine cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) varieties

International Conference
Lekkas D., Saitanis C.J., Riga-Karandinos A.N., Arapis G., Blum O. and Godzik B.
In: e-Proceedings “Protection and restoration of the environment”. June 28 - July 1, 2004. Mykonos, Greece
Publication year: 2004

Biomonitoring of concentrations of platinum elements and their correlations to other metals

Journal Paper
Riga-Karandinos A.N. and Saitanis C.J.
International Journal of Environment and Pollution 22(5):563-579.
Publication year: 2004

Biomonitoring of Pt, Pd, Pb, Mn, Cu, Fe and Zn was conducted using leaves (two and six months old) of laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) ornamental shrubs grown in 14 sampling sites located on the central green belts of six avenues and streets of Athens. In this biomonitoring, we determined, for the first time in Greece, the concentrations of the new urban “pollutants” Pt and Pd, and we estimated the correlations among the concentrations of all the above-mentioned metals as well as among the metal concentrations and the traffic load. Cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) of the data revealed three distinct groups of metals and two groups of sites (one with high and the other with relatively low levels of pollution). Using varimax-rotated PCA for the metals, four factors were extracted explaining 92.3% of the total shared variance, which are further discussed. The importance of seasonal timing of sampling is revealed by the data and discussed in connection with the meteorological conditions.

Ambient ozone phytodetection with sensitive clover (Trifolium subterraneum L. cv. geraldton) in Ukraine

International Conference
Blum O. and Saitanis C.J.
In: Book of Abstracts of the Advanced Research Workshop: “Ecotoxicology, Ecological Risk Assessment and Multiple Stressors”. Oct. 13-16, 2004. Poros, Greece
Publication year: 2004

Air pollution assessment in Volos coastal town, Greece

International Conference
Riga-Karandinos A.N., Saitanis C.J. and Arapis G.
In: “Ecotoxicology, Ecological Risk Assessment and Multiple Stressors”. Arapis G., Goncharova N. and Baveye Ph. (Eds). pp. 317-324, Springer Verlag. ISBN 1-4020-4475-5
Publication year: 2004

A Field Study on the Long-Term Incidence of Acarapis woodi Rennie in Greece

Journal Paper
Bacandritsos N.K., and Saitanis C.J.
Journal of Apicultural Research 43(1):21-26
Publication year: 2004

The long-term incidence (% of apiaries infested) of the mite Acarapis woodi in southern Greece was monitored. Over 10 years the overall average infestation was 5.43%. Yearly maximum infestation (average 28.9%) exhibited a decreasing trend from 1986 to 1995. Infestation tended to peak in November and March and was restricted or absent during the summer. Additionally, seasonal variation of A. woodi density (% of individuals infested per colony) in three groups of colonies was followed for almost three years. At the beginning, Groups I and II had infestation rates of 10.75% and 11.25%, respectively, while Group III was not infested. Group I received no acaricide treatment while Group II was treated with 50 g menthol twice a year. There was no evidence that mites had transferred from infested Groups I and II to nearby non-infested Group III, and no difference in honey production between the groups was observed. There was a rapid decline in the infestation in all three groups, irrespective of treatment, with complete disappearance about seven months before the end of the experiment.

Photoperiodic and temperature effects on the intensity of larval diapause in Sesamia nonagrioides

Journal Paper
Fantinou A.A., Kourti A.T. and Saitanis C.J.
Physiological Entomology 28:82-87
Publication year: 2003

Photochemical air pollutant levels and ozone phytotoxicity in the region of Mesogia–Attica, Greece

Journal Paper
Saitanis C.J., Karandinos M.G., Riga-Karandinos A.N., Lorenzini G. and Vlassi A.
International Journal of Environment and Pollution 19(2):197-208
Publication year: 2003

Ozone: A novel plant "pathogen"

Book Chapter
 Lorenzini, G., and Saitanis C.J.
In: L. Sanita' di Toppi and B. Pawlik-Skowrońska (Editors). Abiotic Stresses in Plants. Kluwer Academic Publishers. Pages 256. ISBN: 1402016484
Publication year: 2003

Ozone is killing the rural areas

Newspaper Interview
Saitanis C.J.
TA NEA, Dec. 1, 2003.  (An interview on the research of our Laboratory about ozone phytotoxicity in Greece)
Publication year: 2003

Ground-level ozone as a phytotoxic agent. The Greek experience

National Conference
Saitanis C.J., Riga-Karandinos A.N., Katsaras D., Lekkas D. and Arapis G.
Hellenic Congress of the Union of Greek Ecologists. Thessaloniki 27-28 Sept. 2003
Publication year: 2003

First report on the concentrations of PGE (Pt, Pb) Biomonitored in Athens

International Conference
Riga-Karandinos A.N. and Saitanis C.J.
8th Conference on Environmental Science and Technology. Sept. 8-10 2003. Limnos, Greece
Publication year: 2003

Effect of photoperiod and temperature in the duration of the larval diapause of the insect Sesamia nonagrioides (Lef.) Lepidoptera-Noctuidae

National Conference
Fantinou A.A., Kourti A. and Saitanis C.J.
10th Panhellenic Entomological Congress. Entomological Society of Greece. Nov. 4-7, 2003. Heraklion Crete. p. 26
Publication year: 2003

Abstract
The intensity of larval diapause in Sesamia nonagrioides Lef (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was investigated under laboratory conditions. Newly hatched larvae were exposed to different stationary photoperiods (from LD 7:17h to LD 14:10 h), at a constant temperature of 25°C. Diapause incidence was higher when larvae were exposed to daylengths shorter than the critical value (LD 12:12 h), whereas the within-treatment variation in the larval period appeared to be significantly correlated with the photoperiod applied. The incidences of diapause and the duration of larval development were also measured after exposing larvae to short photoperiods (LD 8:16 h, LD 10:14 h or LD 12:12 h) in combination with various temperatures (20, 22.5 or 25°C). Although an increase in the incidence of diapause appeared with the lowering of the temperature, no statistical differences were observed in the time needed for pupation within the photoperiodic treatments at the temperatures of 20 and 22.5°C. Furthermore, when diapausing larvae were transferred to the long photoperiod of LD 16:8 h, they immediately proceeded to pupation, regardless of the photoperiod or the temperature to which they had been previously exposed, indicating that there were no differences in the intensity of diapause. Photoperiodic changes from LD 10:14 h to LD 12:12 h or to LD 14:10 h at different larval ages reduced the intensity of diapause with (a) early age of transfer and (b) increase of daylength. By contrast, when larvae were transferred from the long photoperiod of LD 14:10 h to shorter, such as LD 10:14 h or LD 12:12 h, a small increase in the intensity of diapause with the shortening of the daylength was apparent. These results support the hypothesis that insects may compare the duration of the photoperiod and could classify them as either longer or shorter in relation to the critical value.

Caesium-137 distribution in the soil in a semi-natural ecosystem in Greece

International Conference
Arapis G., Saitanis C.J. and Salakou G.
8th Conference on Environmental Science and Technology. Sept. 8-10, 2003. Limnos, Greece
Publication year: 2003

Background ozone monitoring and phytodetection in the greater rural area of Corinth – Greece

Journal Paper
Saitanis C.J.
Chemosphere 51(9):913-923
Publication year: 2003

Abstract

Natural background ozone levels were monitored in three places within the greater rural area of Corinth, namely Bogdani Hill, Astronomical Observatory of Krionerion, and Kiato, and compared with ambient ozone monitored in the metropolitan area of Athens. Measurements were made sequentially, for a few weeks at each place, during the summer of 2000. In addition, ozone phytodetection, using tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants of the Bel-W3 and Zichnomirodata varieties, was conducted in 12 places (the above included). Moreover, stomatal conductance was measured in the Bel-W3 plants, as well as in leaves of cultivated grape-vines (Vitis vinifera L.) and in needles of Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill.) trees and compared with the diurnal pattern of ozone concentrations.

The 24 and 12 (08:00–20:00) hourly averages of ozone concentrations were high in Athens (37; 51 ppb), at Bogdani Hill (53; 56 ppb) and at the Astronomical Observatory (56; 55 ppb), but relatively low in Kiato (30; 34 ppb). Furthermore, the average daily AOT40 (accumulated exposure over 40 ppb for the daylight hours) (ppb h) was 193 in Athens, 212 at Bogdani Hill, 192 at the Astronomical Observatory and 47 in Kiato. Ozone concentrations exhibited the usual diurnal pattern in Athens (altitude 50 m), where they were maximum during midday and early afternoon hours, as well as at Bogdani Hill (300 m) and in Kiato (5 m) where, however, they were maximal 1–3 h later. At the Astronomical Observatory (altitude 920 m) ozone remained constant during both daylight and night hours. The differences in diurnal patterns are consistent with those in places of different elevation, reported elsewhere.

The Bel-W3 plants were injured at all 12 places; Zichnomirodata plants exhibited lower injury and only in some of the places; probable ozone symptoms were also observed on vine plants and pine trees. The greatest injury was observed at the high altitude places of Astronomical Observatory and Mougostos. Stomatal conductance, in all three species, peaked during morning and early midday hours when ozone levels were higher in the high altitude, and lower in the low altitude, places.

An interview about the Ozone phytotoxicity in the greater region of Volos and Pelion Mt.

Radio Interview
Saitanis C.J.
Broadcasted on Dec. 1, 2003,. RADIO ONE. The radio station of Volos city
Publication year: 2003

An interview about effects of ozone on plants

Radio Interview
Saitanis C.J.
Dec. 1, 2003. Radio Station of the Municipality of Athens – 984 FM. An interview about effects of ozone on plants
Publication year: 2003

Strain pepper plants with ozone

National Conference
 Saitanis C.J., Lekkas D., Riga-Karandinos A.N., Arapis G.
2º Panhellenic Conference of Biological Sciences for the Environment. Apr. 19-21, 2002, Athens
Publication year: 2002

Seasonal variations in the concentration of trace metals in leaves of laurel, used as bioindicator of urban traffic pollution in Athens

Journal Paper
Riga-Karandinos A.N., Saitanis  C.J. and Paxinou H.
Environmental Science & Pollution Research 3:162-163
Publication year: 2002

Recording ozone concentrations and evaluating its phytotoxicity in rural areas of Corinth – Greece

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Katsaras D., Lekkas D., Riga-Karandinos A.N. and Arapis G.
Proc. Int. Conf. Protection and Restoration of the Environment. IV. (Εds. V. A. Tsihrintzis, G. P. Korfiatis and A. Kungolos), Skiathos, Greece. 2002. Vol. II, pp 825-830
Publication year: 2002

Phytotoxic levels of ozone detected by plants in the greater region of Pagasitikos gulf and at Mt Pelion

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Katsaras D., Lekkas D., Riga-Karandinos A.N. and Arapis G.
Proc. Int. Conf. Protection and Restoration of the Environment. IV. (eds. V.A. Tsihrintzis, G.P. Korfiatis and A. Kungolos), Skiathos, Greece. 2002. Vol. III, pp 1867-9
Publication year: 2002

Ozone: a new phytotoxic threat in Mediterranean basin and Greece

National Conference
Saitanis C.J.
2nd Panhellenic Conference of Biological Sciences for the Environment. 19-21 April 2002, Athens
Publication year: 2002

Levels of benzene toluene and xylene in Artemida (Loutsa) Attica

National Conference
Saitanis C.J., Vlassis A., Lekkas D. and Arapis G.
2nd Panhellenic Conference of Biological Sciences for the Environment. Apr. 19-21, 2002, Athens
Publication year: 2002

Effects of ozone on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) varieties

Journal Paper
Saitanis C.J. and  Karandinos M.G.
Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science 188:51-58
Publication year: 2002

Abstract

Plants of Bel-W3 and of seven commercial tobacco varieties (Nicotiana tabacum L.) were exposed to two relatively low ozone concentrations (90 or 135 ppb) for 20 consecutive days, for 8 h per day. Ozone caused necrotic and chlorotic spots, acceleration of leaf senescence, depression of photosynthetic mechanism, chlorophyll diminution and greater destruction of chl a than of chl b. The higher sensitivity of chl a was also confirmed by exposure of segments of leaves in test tubes to high ozone concentration (>1000 ppb) as well as by bubbling of ozone in extracts of chlorophyll in vitro. The quantum yield (QY) of photosynthesis was positively correlated with the chlorophyll content and negatively correlated with the visible injury and the chl b/a ratio.

Correlations between air pollutants in Mesogeia, Attica

National Conference
Saitanis C.J.,. Karandinos M, Vlassis A., and Katsaras D.
2nd Panhellenic Conference of Biological Sciences for the Environment. Apr. 19-21, 2002, Athens
Publication year: 2002

Biomonitoring of phytotoxic Ozone Levels at Pelion

National Conference
Saitanis C.J., Katsaras D., Lekkas D. and Arapis G.
In: Proceedings of the 1st Environmental Conference of Macedonia. Thessaloniki, Mar. 1-4, 2002
Publication year: 2002

Background benzene–toluene–xylene levels in Mesogia Plain, Attica – Greece

Journal Paper
Saitanis C.J., Karandinos M.G., Riga-Karandinos A.N. and Vlassi A.
Environmental Science & Pollution Research 3:164–165
Publication year: 2002

 2002. . .

A three-year study of the movement of 134Cs from soil to asparagus plants

National Conference
Bebelou E., Lyra D.A., Panagopoulos G., Saitanis C.J. and Arapis G.
2nd Panhellenic Conference of Biological Sciences for the Environment. Apr. 19-21, 2002, Athens.
Publication year: 2002

A study of the phytotoxic symptoms of ozone in cotton

National Conference
Saitanis C.J., Lekkas D., Katsaras D. and Arapis G.
2nd Panhellenic Conference of Biological Sciences for the Environment. Apr. 19-21, 2002, Athens
Publication year: 2002

Monitoring and biomonitoring ambient ozone in the Greek mainland

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Karandinos M.G., Lekkas D., Katsaras D., Riga-Karandinos A. and Arapis G.
In: EURASAP Workshop on Air Pollution & the Natural Environment: Biological Monitoring. Apr. 25-27, 2001. Sofia, Bulgaria. pp. 30-31
Publication year: 2001

Instrumental recording of ozone and other pollutants in the region of Mesogia of Attica. Biomonitoring of ozone phytotoxicity

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Karandinos M.G., Vlassi A., Katsaras D. and Arapis G.
In: Proceedings of the 7th Conference on Environmental Science and Technology. University of the Aegean. Dep. of Environmental Studies.  Ermoupolis, Syros. Greece, Sep., 3-6, 2001. pp 755-762
Publication year: 2001

Instrumental recording and biomonitoring of ambient ozone in Greek countryside

Journal Paper
Saitanis C.J. and Karandinos M.G.
Chemosphere 44:813-821
Publication year: 2001

Abstract

Among eight commercial Greek varieties of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) tested for their ozone-sensitivity levels, the Zichnomirodata (KK6/5) variety was found to be the most sensitive, although less sensitive than the well-known super-sensitive Bel-W3. Besides qualitative differences in the appearance of macroscopic symptoms these two varieties can be used simultaneously as a reliable pair of ozone bioindicators. The occurrence of ozone in the Greek countryside was surveyed by biomonitoring in 14 rural regions over the country and by a simultaneous biomonitoring and instrumental recording of ozone concentrations at a single remote side (Pournaria, Arcadia). Phytotoxic symptoms were observed mainly on the leaves of Bel-W3 and occasionally on those of Zichnomirodata varieties, suggesting that ozone levels were high enough to affect at least sensitive species. The instrumental monitoring (during a total period of 912 h) revealed maximum hourly O3 concentration 62 ppb, while the thresholds of 30, 40 and 50 ppb were exceeded for 40%, 20% and 6% of the recording period, respectively. The accumulated exposure over 40 ppb (AOT40) for the daylight hours over the 38 monitored days was 680 ppb h.

Impact of the road project accessing the tunnel of Hymettus, in the urban environment. Management suggestions

National Conference
Riga-Karandinos A., Saitanis C.J. and Arapis G. 
In the workshop: "The tunnel Hymettus along with its accesses (linking Poseidonos Av.  to Spata Airport)", organized by the Municipalities Greek and Argyroupoli. 17/02/2001
Publication year: 2001

Effects of ozone on chlorophyll and quantum yield of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) varieties

Journal Paper
Saitanis, C.J., Riga-Karandinos A.N. and Karandinos M.G. 
Chemosphere 42(8): 945-953
Publication year: 2001

Abstract

Plants of Bel-W3 and of seven commercial tobacco varieties (Nicotiana tabacum L.) were exposed to two relatively low ozone concentrations (90 or 135 ppb) for 20 consecutive days, for 8 h per day. Ozone caused necrotic and chlorotic spots, acceleration of leaf senescence, depression of photosynthetic mechanism, chlorophyll diminution and greater destruction of chl a than of chl b. The higher sensitivity of chl a was also confirmed by exposure of segments of leaves in test tubes to high ozone concentration (>1000 ppb) as well as by bubbling of ozone in extracts of chlorophyll in vitro. The quantum yield (QY) of photosynthesis was positively correlated with the chlorophyll content and negatively correlated with the visible injury and the chl b/a ratio.

A study of the absorption of 134Cs by asparagus plants

National Conference
Bebelou E., Lyra D.A., Saitanis C.J. and Arapis G.
National Conference of Environmental Radioactivity. Nov. 23-24, 2001
Publication year: 2001

Monitoring of tropospheric ozone in a pineforest in Corinth, Greece

National Conference
Saitanis C.J., Karandinos M.G. and Lekkas D.B.
10th Hellenic Phytopathological Congress. Kalamata Οκτ. 3-5, 2000. ISBN 960-8002-10-9. p. 66.
Publication year: 2000

Journal Paper
Arapis, G., M. Voutsinas, and C.J. Saitanis.
Journal of Balkan Ecology 3:86-94.
Publication year: 2000

Ozone is elevated in Mediterranean Basin

Newspaper Interview
Karandinos M & Saitanis C..
TA NEA. Mar. 16, 1999 (An Interview about the phytotoxicity of ozone in Greece)
Publication year: 1999

Ozone Effects on Chlorophyll and Quantum Yield of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) Varieties

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., Riga-Karandinos A.N. and Karandinos M.G.
European Ecological Congress. Sep. 18-23, 1999. Halkidiki, Greece. pp. 432
Publication year: 1999

Environment and Agriculture

Book
Kaltiskes P., Saitanis C.J., Lolos G., Tabourantzi S. and Goufa M.
Editor: Institute of Education – Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs. Korifi Publishers. Athens, Greece. pp. 280. ISBN: 960-7251-52-0 (In Greek language). Addressed to the Vocational High Schools of Greece
Publication year: 1999

Cs-137 Concentrations in the Lichen Cladonia convoluta from Athens and Budapest Regions ten Years after the Chernobyl Accident

International Conference
Karandinos M.G., Riga-Karandinos A.N., Saitanis C.J., Turcsany G. and Manetas N.
European Ecological Congress. Sep. 18-23, 1999. Halkidiki, Greece. pp. 405
Publication year: 1999

The lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea as bioindicator in the streets of Athens, with the method of "relocation"

National Conference
Panagiotopoulou S., Riga-Karandinos A.N. and Saitanis C.J.
In: Proceedings of the 20th Panhellenic Conference of the Greek Society of Biological Sciences. Samos, May 28-31, 1998. pp. 237-238
Publication year: 1998

Species diversity and relationship number of species - abundance: Data of captured aphids

National Conference
Karandinos M., Katis N., Tsitsipis I. and Saitanis C.
In: Proceedings of the 20th Panhellenic Conference of the Greek Society of Biological Sciences. Samos, May 28-31, 1998. pp. 105-6.
Publication year: 1998

Measurement and biomonitoring of ozone levels in a rural area in central Peloponnese

National Conference
Saitanis C.J. and Karandinos M.G.
9th Hellenic Phytopathological Congress. Athens, Oct. 3-5, 1998. p. 108
Publication year: 1998

Effects of ozone in the quantum yield of photosynthesis and chlorophyll of exposed tobacco plants

National Conference
Saitanis C., Riga-Karandinos A.N. and Karandinos M.G.
In: Proceedings of the 20th Panhellenic Conference of the Greek Society of Biological Sciences. Samos, May 28-31, 1998. pp.305-306
Publication year: 1998

Relative sensitivity of Greek oriental tobacco cultivars to ozone

International Conference
Saitanis C.J., and Karandinos M.G.
In: Proceedings of the 4th Conference on Environmental Science and Technology. Volume A. pages 603-612. Edited by Th. Lekkas. University of the Aegean. Dep. of Environmental Studies.  Molyvos, Lesvos, Greece, Sep. 4-7, 1995
Publication year: 1995

Are there Any Phytotoxic Levels of O3 in Rural Area of Greece? 

International Conference
Saitanis C.J. and Karandinos M.G.
In: “Aspects on Environmental Toxicology” Edited by V. Kotsaki-Kovatsi and A.J. Vafiadou. p. 40-43. Proc. 33rd International Congress on Forensic (TIAFT) & 1st on Environmental Toxicology. Thessaloniki Aug. 27-31, 1995
Publication year: 1995

Response of Bel-W3 tobacco plants to ozone in several sites of the Greater Athens Region of Greece

International Conference
Karandinos M.G. and  Saitanis C.J.
In: "Bioindicators Deteriorisationis Regionis", Ed. J. Bohac. Proc. of the 6th International Conference, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic, Sept. 15-21, 1991, p. 194-201
Publication year: 1992

Ozone effects on Bel-W3 and Greek tobacco varieties in the greater Athens region

International Conference
Karandinos M.G. and Saitanis C.J.
Proc. CORESTA International Congress. p. 234-244. Jerez de la Frontera, Spain. Oct. 11-16, 1992
Publication year: 1992